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Seven Trends to Try at Home This Fall

As designers, editors, and homeowners descended on New York’s Pier 94 for the Architectural Digest Design Show last week, AD‘s market team was on the lookout for the best trends. With myriad exhibitors across multiple categories, the fair had no shortage of inspiration. But once the dust settles, what will last? Below, our market editors share the seven trends they think we’ll be seeing more of this year.

 

Abstract Art–Inspired Pattern

Abstract Art–Inspired Pattern

Taking art off the canvas and onto the floor and walls, abstract accents add modern and playful pops of color to any room. Clockwise from top left: wallpaper by Wallpaper Projects, Aldrin rug by Woven Concepts, Tarmack rug by Inigo Elizalde Rugs, Of Quartz It Is wallpaper by Flavor Paper, and Zepher wallpaper by Flat Vernacular.
Gilded Accents

Gilded Accents

We can’t take our eyes off these gorgeous gilded and golden accents sure to elevate any interior space. Clockwise from top left: stacking candle holders by Fort Standard, wall treatments by Atelier Premiere, side table by A Space, and drinks table by Erickson Aesthetics.
Brightly Colored Kitchen and Bath

Brightly Colored Kitchen and Bath

With spring in the air, everyone is thinking color. We saw this trend most surprisingly in the kitchen and bath categories, with everything from stoves to vanities in kicky hues. Clockwise from top left: Hestan Outdoor Deluxe Grill with Side Burner, SMEG Portofino Range (coming in September), Majestic Techno Collection range in Emerald by ILVE, Dual Electric Double Self Clean Oven by Bertazzoni, and Amora vanity in navy by Ronbow.
Cutout Details

Cutout Details

See-through circles and graphic cutouts add instant appeal and a touch of whimsy to larger furniture pieces and smaller tabletop accessories alike. Clockwise from right: Bower’s wool and walnut Ring Chair, hand-carved Bangle table from Tucker Robbins, rainbow-colored Lattice Geo placemats by Echo, and Vermont Modern’s Bloom pendants by Hubbardton Forge.
Green

Green

Martyn Lawrence Bullard summed it up when asked for his favorite trend right now: green! From the kitchen and bath to the den and dining room, the sophisticated and saturated hue has found its way into all areas of home decor. Clockwise from right: Artistic Tile’s Triangulum in malachite glass and brass, Pyramids marble side table by Erickson Aesthetics, Bastet stool by Ped Woodworking, and Matthew Ward’s playful ceramics.
Organic Shapes

Organic Shapes

This spring it’s all about movement! Fluid lines and abstract forms created some of the most dynamic works at the show. Clockwise from top: Patrick Weder’s Honeycomb light sculpture, Snaka Waka Cameroon carvings from Tucker Robbins, Marco Guglielmino’s electric light design, Table No. 5 by J.M. Syzmanskifeaturing iron powder and magnets, and Tubular Group 01 by Ara Levon Thorose.
Light, Natural Wood

Light, Natural Wood

Chic, bright, and airy, light-colored wood provides stability without weighing down a room, and it’s more modern than its heavier counterpart. Clockwise from top left: counterweight light by Fort Standard, Una chair by Estudio Persona, RB bench by Woodsport, stool in Montgomery Ash by Crump & Kwash,chair by Wren and Cooper.
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Here Are Pantone’s Color Trend Predictions for 2018

We’re only a few months into 2017, but that hasn’t stopped Pantone from looking inside their colorful crystal ball. At the International Home & Housewares Show in Chicago this week, the international authority on color gave attendees a peek into what’s on trend for 2018.

While we still have about eight months of Greenery (whether you like it or not) until they announce the new Color of the Year, Pantone Color Institute Executive Director Leatrice Eiseman was at the show sharing color and design trends for 2018.

“Metallics we know are classic,” Eiseman said, according to trade publication Home Accents Today. “But they have really moved over into neutrals.” We certainly see no signs of these shiny metals waning. Same goes for the iridescent trend: “The human eye can absolutely not avoid” anything iridescent, pearlized or translucent, since being intrigued by shimmering, shiny objects is “intrinsic to human development.”

In terms of color, the trend is continuing away from pastels (like 2016’s Colors of the Year Serenity and Rose Quartz) to more vibrant hues—though they won’t entirely fade by 2018. “Intense colors seem to be a natural application of our intense lifestyles and thought processes these days,” she said.

 
Top row: Vedure, Playful, Discretion, TECH-nique. Bottom row: Far-Fetched, Resourceful, Intricacy, Intensity

(Image credit: Pantone)

Pantone also revealed eight palettes for home and interiors for the upcoming year at the Housewares show. They are:

Vedure—Nature inspired hues, like celery, robin’s egg blue, and berry purple. “This palette is so symbolic of health,” said Eiseman.

Playful—Definitely not a palette to take too seriously, this one brings the fun—especially with colors like Minion Yellow and Lime Popsicle.

Descretion—Pretty much the opposite of Playful, this is mostly subtle, desaturated hues like Elderberry and Hawthorne Rose. “Pink has developed more power than ever before,” said Eiseman.

TECH-nique—A nod to technology, with bright turquoise, pink, and purple hues, and balanced with Brilliant White and Frosted Almond.

Far-Fetched—This palette “reaches out and embraces many different cultures,” said Eiseman. Lots of warm, earthy hues like Rooibos Tea and Cornsilk Yellow.

Resourceful—Mostly made up of complementary colors blue and orange, “it combines warm and cool tones that you just can’t avoid looking at it.”

Intricacy—Full of those new neutral metallics, with a pop of Holly Berry Red and yellow Sulfur for drama.

Intensity—This one conveys “a certain strength, power, depth and sophistication,” said Eiseman, despite being an eclectic collection of colors. Black and gold balance the varying hues.

 

Source: http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/here-are-pantones-color-trend-predictions-for-2018-243598

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20 things every twenty-something should have in their home

Mostly copper, marble and velvet

1. Pineapple accessories

2. Tiny cactuses/plants/succulents… in a variety of different pots. Bonus if they hang.

3. A fluffy geometric rug

4. A framed quote… (preferably in copper)

 

5. A marble table… preferably with geometric legs, placed strategically on a neutral geometric rug.

6. Copper everything… usually in the form of but not limited to: frames, lamps, mirrors, pots, vases and candle holders.

7. Lots of pointless throw cushions… well, the LOOK good, but they will prevent you from being able to sit down properly.

8. A statement velvet chair… because PRETTY.

9. A photo wall… made up of prints and posters (and probably a framed quote).

10. An Instagrammable desk set-up… even if you don’t work from home.

11. Funky bathroom tiles… essential for ‘from where I stand’ grams.

12. Geometric lights with exposed bulbs… in white, black or copper only.

13. Coffee table books… preferably Chanel or Vogue.

14. A random flamingo… can be in the form of a lamp, cushion, salt and pepper shakers or just a pointless ornament.

15. This palm tree from Ikea… bonus points if you put it in a wicker basket.

16. A lightbox…

17. Palm print/cactus cushions… (or chairs, or lamp shades, or bedding).

18. A statement mirror…

19. A large floor lamp…

20. A star lamp/wall light…

Source: http://www.cosmopolitan.com/uk/worklife/a9168199/twenty-something-interior-home-inspiration/

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Next Wave Natural: The New Way to Do Wooden Kitchen Cabinets

We predicted that natural materials and warmer finishes would rule the kitchen in 2017 (here are our other guesses). One way we’re seeing this natural-material trend play out, thanks in part to the popularity of minimalism, is with unpainted, unfinished wooden cabinets. The casual look combines the sleek style we expect in contemporary kitchens with the natural warmth of wood—just another reason we’re adding “kitchen renovation” to our home wish lists.

(Image credit: Bungalow5)

The Danish company Dinesen, makers of beautiful plank wood flooring, decided to use the natural material throughout the entire room, covering both the walls and cabinets. The result is minimalist, yet warm and inviting. See the rest of the room on Bungalow5.

We’ve talked before about the beauty of mismatched kitchens, and the one above from Shoot Factory featured on DecorPad is no exception. I’m now convinced that textured wood below, glass cabinets above, and marble in the middle is the recipe for a flawless kitchen.

(Image credit: Domino)

It’s no surprise that this relaxed kitchen is nestled inside a quaint 1920s storybook-style home in Oakland Hills. If you’re a fan of butcher block counter, this kitchen shows us you don’t have to stop there—extend the look to the cabinets, as well. Tour the rest of this fairy-tale home over on Domino.

(Image credit: Nordic Design)

If you’re looking to channel cozy cabin vibes, draw inspiration from this Norwegian kitchen found on Nordic Design. All wood everything looks great with a long horizontal window that seriously improves your view while washing dishes.

Matching wooden cabinets and window frames pull the room together, while clean white subway tiles keep the look fresh. To maintain flat-front cabinets’ sleek appearance, pair them with recessed hardware that blends in seamlessly. Every single room of this home styled by Tina Hellberg for Elle Decoration deserves a spot on your Pinterest board—explore them all on Oracle Fox.

(Image credit: The Style Files)

The reclaimed wood, substantial metal hardware and stainless steel range hood in this kitchen from The Style Files will make fans of warm industrial style happy.

(Image credit: Design Milk)

In this New Zealand home by MRTN Architects featured on Design Milk, pale wood cabinets join forces with black hardware for a striking study in contrasts.

(Image credit: deVOL)

In this deVOL kitchen, natural slated cabinet fronts sit beside those with a dark wood stain. Consider skipping the hardware altogether and cut holes in the cabinet fronts for a minimalist alternative.

(Image credit: Swoon Editions)

While your first instinct may be to balance wooden cabinets with crisp white walls, critics of the all-white kitchen will be pleased to see how beautifully jewel-tones complement reclaimed wood cabinets and shelves in Swoon Edition‘s showroom, above.

 

Source: http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/10-beautiful-kitchens-rocking-natural-wood-cabinets-241030

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PSA: This Is What Guests Really Notice in Your Home

What is the first thing you do when getting your house ready for guests to come over? Think of it as a hypothetical scenario—your co-worker has decided to drop by your house with 15 minutes warning. Do you hide away your pile of dirty clothes? Light a candle? Dim the lights? Throw dirty dishes in the dishwasher? What about when your relatives come to stay with you for an extended period of time? Do you repaint a room that’s been bothering you? Hang art that’s been leaning against your baseboards for too long? Do you refresh your space with plants and flowers?

When faced with having to turn a home into the best version of itself for dinner parties, casual get-togethers, and overnight guests, we often discover just how real the struggle is. To find out once and for all what people actually notice in our homes, we asked our Instagram followers. With an overwhelming 120 answers, our readers shed light on this pressing issue. Here is the definitive guide to what your guests definitely see in your space (that you probably don’t). 

COHESIVENESS AND FLOW

how to stage your home
PHOTO: Courtesy of Elizabeth Roberts

Many of our readers pointed out the flow and furniture placement in a home to be the first thing they noticed: “Certain things can make me feel uncomfortable in a space, like a poor furniture layout or pictures hung too high,” said one reader. “I often find I am unconsciously fixing rooms in my mind. It just happens.” Many readers admitted to being guilty of mentally rearranging other people’s furniture. Others noticed how cohesive the flow was from one room to the next.

Quick fix: Limit your color scheme from room to room. When in doubt, edit things out of your space to see if the flow improves.

CLEANLINESS AND CLUTTER

how to stage your home
PHOTO: Courtesy of Studio McGee

If you get stressed out about friends and family seeing your real-life mess when popping by unannounced, turns out you may have reason to. Another sticky point for many readers: cleanliness, tidiness, and organization. For some readers, it rubbed their neat-freak tendencies the wrong way. For others, it made them feel better about their own mess.

Quick fix: When having visitors over, make a point to tidy up any clutter and give your space a quick clean.

Murchison-Hume Counter Safe Surface Spray ($10)

ART AND BOOKS

how to stage your home
PHOTO: Courtesy of Katie Hodges

People want to know what kind of culture you consume—from what art is displayed on your walls to what books or magazines you read. “I usually notice what’s on the shelves or the walls first,” said @bratbratcity. More specifically, our readers pointed out that art should say a lot about its owners, and it shouldn’t be generic.

Quick fix: Edit your bookcase to display the books that represent you best, and do an inventory of your art—does it actually reflect your interests and personality? If not, consider working on your art collection.

SCENTS AND SMELLS

how to stage your home
PHOTO: Tessa Neustadt; DESIGN: Katherine Carter

Does your home have an inviting scent—a luxe burning candle, perhaps, or a chicken roasting in the oven? Or does it smell like you haven’t taken out the garbage or changed the kitty litter in weeks? “Smell always triggers my memory first,” @allizonsaid. “I love when I start to memorize the smell of a friend’s home.” Conversely, readers noticed the bad smells just as much as the good ones.

Quick fix: Burn a candle 10 to 15 minutes before guests arrive, or cook something in the oven. Lastly, find the culprits that may be giving your home a funky smell, like the microwave or the garbage disposal.

LIGHT SOURCES

how to stage your home
PHOTO: Courtesy of Studio Ashby

When walking into your home, guests will most likely notice natural light, but they’ll also pick up on artificial lighting and how light is arranged around the room. “I don’t notice the fixtures, but I notice the things that illuminate and obscure a room: afternoon light pouring through windows, the gentle glow of candles, the spotlights on art, the cold halogen light, the blue light flashing from a TV screen,” said @h2cho. “The quality of light sets the mood of a space. The same space can feel cozy, massive, mysterious, familiar, enchanting, or humdrum with just a change of light.”

Quick fix: If it’s daytime, draw open your curtains and roll up your blinds. If it’s nighttime, light a few candles, dim your lights, and turn off the TV.

Norm Architects Sten Floor Lamp ( $2650 ) ($2253)

PAINT COLORS

how to stage your home
PHOTO: Courtesy of Fantastic Frank

It turns out that unless your room is a neutral white, your guests probably have strong opinions about which color you decided to paint your walls. Specifically, they aren’t a fan of red or brown walls. “It all generally hits me at once. I can get car sick if a wall is painted ‘cappuccino’,” said @virgomadnesss. “I have to rearrange in my head.”

Quick fix: If you’ve fallen out of love with your paint choices, try these designer-approved neutral hues.

Benjamin Moore Normandy ($37)

PLANTS AND GREENERY

how to stage your home
PHOTO: Courtesy of Studio Ashby

Finally, guests often notice your plants, flowers, and greenery, or how much of it is visible from the inside. “I’m such a huge plant mom that I always look to see what life others are cultivating in their space,” said @littledove.

Quick fix: Get rid of any dying plants in your space, and refresh your main rooms with fresh flowers of branches.

Source: http://www.mydomaine.com/how-to-stage-your-home/slide12

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Don’t Waste an Inch: Ideas for Using a Really Narrow Room

Have you got a landing, a spare room, a bit of hallway—any particularly small sliver of space in your home that’s searching for its purpose? Narrow rooms can pose a special challenge, but this doesn’t mean that you can’t make the most of that space. Here’s a little inspiration for getting the most out of a (really, really) narrow room.

(Image credit: Fantastic Frank)

Since that’s the idea of this post, I thought I’d start with the very narrowest of these rooms: this little nook from Fantastic Frank, which is not much wider than a hallway. These homeowners have managed to squeeze a lot of utility out of this tiny space: wall mounted shelves provide storage without taking up floor space, and a particularly deep shelf functions as a workspace. The lounge chair pulls out to a bed, so the space can function as a guest room, too.

(Image credit: Apartment Therapy )

An antique desk is the perfect solution for turning this little nook from Jamie and Byron’s San Francisco house into a cozy workspace.

(Image credit: David Boyle)

Even the narrowest of rooms can make a great workspace, as evidenced by this interior from David Boyle. Shelves don’t have to be particularly deep to hold standard paperbacks: the shelves on the left are made from standard lumber and are (I’m guessing) only 5.5 inches deep.

(Image credit: Nightingale Design)

If you have enough space you can squeeze in a workspace and a cozy spot for lounging, as seen in this staircase landing by Nightingale Design.

(Image credit: A Cup of Jo)

In this sunny spot from A Cup of Jo, a wall-mounted shelf/desk and a built-in bench make the most of a narrow space.

(Image credit: Robert McKinley)

Sectional sofas can make a surprisingly good solution for smaller spaces, like this one from Robert McKinley. If you can’t find a sectional that’s just the right shape or size, try piecing together a modular sofa.

(Image credit: Lonny)

In a space that’s too narrow to place two sofas across from one another, you can still create a conversational grouping with an upholstered bench. Image from Lonny.

(Image credit: Dwell)

In this space from Dwell, double workspaces make the most of a narrow room.

(Image credit: Country Living)

If your room is just a little bit wider (like this stair landing from Country Living) you may be able to squeeze in a full-sized couch and a desk. That’s multitasking at its best.

Source: http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/dont-waste-an-inch-ideas-for-using-a-really-narrow-room-241147

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20 Bathrooms With Transformative Tiles

The right tiles can transform any basic space into a breathtaking escape.

These ancient pieces—that are both decorative and functional—have stood the test of time for their ability to provide texture, color, depth, and pattern. Today, tiles rejuvenate modern floors and walls alike, particularly in bathrooms. Below are 20 examples of transformative tiles in the most rejuvenating room in the home.

Hexagonal tiles made by the Portland Cement Company continue the pattern in the bathroom, where the architect designed low drawers and cabinets that are easy for Luna to reach.
Hexagonal tiles made by the Portland Cement Company continue the pattern in the bathroom, where the architect designed low drawers and cabinets that are easy for Luna to reach.

Photo: Cedric Angeles
Husband-and-wife ceramic artists, Dear Human, baked x-shaped decals into store-bought Olympia Tile before arranging them in the kids’ bathroom. The tub is by Bette and the sink, set in a Corian countertop, is by Duravit.
Husband-and-wife ceramic artists, Dear Human, baked x-shaped decals into store-bought Olympia Tile before arranging them in the kids’ bathroom. The tub is by Bette and the sink, set in a Corian countertop, is by Duravit.

Photo: Ema Peter
The bathroom, located just adjacent to the kitchen, features a pattern of gray and turquoise tiles that climbs from the floors up the walls. They serve as a burst of color among the predominately white walls elsewhere, transforming the bathroom into one of the apartment’s most striking spaces.
The bathroom, located just adjacent to the kitchen, features a pattern of gray and turquoise tiles that climbs from the floors up the walls. They serve as a burst of color among the predominately white walls elsewhere, transforming the bathroom into one of the apartment’s most striking spaces.

The second-floor bathroom's colorful Tex tiles from Mutina sport an array of different textures for a unique tactile experience.
The second-floor bathroom’s colorful Tex tiles from Mutina sport an array of different textures for a unique tactile experience.

Photo: Brian W. Ferry
After completing the renovation of his home in Austin, Texas, photographer and designer Chase Daniel shared the final result of his bathroom. He covered the walls with triangle tiles from Fireclay Tile in the shades of Rosemary, Salton Sea, and Frost.
After completing the renovation of his home in Austin, Texas, photographer and designer Chase Daniel shared the final result of his bathroom. He covered the walls with triangle tiles from Fireclay Tile in the shades of Rosemary, Salton Sea, and Frost.

Photo: Chase Daniel
In the master bathroom, the Smiths worked with a Boston-based company, Artaic, on the mosaic tile.
In the master bathroom, the Smiths worked with a Boston-based company, Artaic, on the mosaic tile.

Photo: Ye-h Photography
The bathrooms are tiled in bright blue mosaic to offset the home’s limited materials and color palette. The sinks, toilets, and tubs are by Villeroy & Boch, while the faucets and towel rails are by Grohe and Avenir, respectively.
The bathrooms are tiled in bright blue mosaic to offset the home’s limited materials and color palette. The sinks, toilets, and tubs are by Villeroy & Boch, while the faucets and towel rails are by Grohe and Avenir, respectively.

In the tiled master bathroom, the boys get their own sink.

Photo: Bryce Duffy
White-and-blue, wood-grain–patterned UonUon tiles by 14oraitaliana line the bathroom walls in a loft above the garage.
White-and-blue, wood-grain–patterned UonUon tiles by 14oraitaliana line the bathroom walls in a loft above the garage.

Photo: Brian W. Ferry
The marble continues in a bathroom, which has a Palomba sink from Laufen.
The marble continues in a bathroom, which has a Palomba sink from Laufen.

Photo: Shannon McGrath
Bold color is embraced in the home’s first bathroom, with tilework by Trend Mosiacs. Faucets are by Grohe and vanities are by Hastings. A Flos Glo-Ball pendant light illuminates the space.
Bold color is embraced in the home’s first bathroom, with tilework by Trend Mosiacs. Faucets are by Grohe and vanities are by Hastings. A Flos Glo-Ball pendant light illuminates the space.

Amending Meeuwissen’s early request for an open bathroom space, the architects devised a more private chamber with an overhead skylight and walls in stone tile from Intercodam Tegels.
Amending Meeuwissen’s early request for an open bathroom space, the architects devised a more private chamber with an overhead skylight and walls in stone tile from Intercodam Tegels.

Photo: Kasia Gatkowska
Architect Barbara Bestor added a striped floor of Santander Granada Tile, Douglas Fir cladding, and Granada Serengeti tile flipped to create a one-of-a-kind pattern on the wall.
Architect Barbara Bestor added a striped floor of Santander Granada Tile, Douglas Fir cladding, and Granada Serengeti tile flipped to create a one-of-a-kind pattern on the wall.

A sculptural freestanding washbasin by Gessi is found in the first-floor powder room. The hex tiles are courtesy of Dear Human.
A sculptural freestanding washbasin by Gessi is found in the first-floor powder room. The hex tiles are courtesy of Dear Human.

Photo: Ema Peter
Consider this lively bathroom that sits within a recently completed waterfront home in Bridgehampton, New York. Situated on two-and-a-half acres of land with 360-degree views of the nearby bay and ocean, it's covered with brightly colored floor-to-ceiling tiles that reflect the shades of the neighboring water. One step through the sliding glass doors and you’ll find yourself on an open terrace.
Consider this lively bathroom that sits within a recently completed waterfront home in Bridgehampton, New York. Situated on two-and-a-half acres of land with 360-degree views of the nearby bay and ocean, it’s covered with brightly colored floor-to-ceiling tiles that reflect the shades of the neighboring water. One step through the sliding glass doors and you’ll find yourself on an open terrace.

The master bathroom, outfitted with Bisazza tiling, has a view of the backyard from the tub.
The master bathroom, outfitted with Bisazza tiling, has a view of the backyard from the tub.

Photo: Chad Holder
In the upper-level bathroom, tiles painstakingly fired by DeSimio cover the walls and ceiling.
In the upper-level bathroom, tiles painstakingly fired by DeSimio cover the walls and ceiling.

Photo: Paul Barbera
Wood meets white marble in this well-lit bathroom by architect Craig Steely. Contrasting materials make for a warm and serene bathing atmosphere in this Berkeley, California home.
Wood meets white marble in this well-lit bathroom by architect Craig Steely. Contrasting materials make for a warm and serene bathing atmosphere in this Berkeley, California home.

Photo: Craig Steely
Monochrome tiles define the shape of this transparent bathroom shower. Designer Stacy Zarin Goldberg of Breeze Giannasio Interiors filled this space with thick visual texture and functional designation between the shower floor and the rest of the room.
Monochrome tiles define the shape of this transparent bathroom shower. Designer Stacy Zarin Goldberg of Breeze Giannasio Interiors filled this space with thick visual texture and functional designation between the shower floor and the rest of the room.

Courtesy of Breeze Giannasio
Fiery mosaics tile the majority of this Hawaiian tub room. Built and occupied by architect Craig Steely and his wife, the rest of the home is just as warm and tranquil aptly named Lavaflow 2.
Fiery mosaics tile the majority of this Hawaiian tub room. Built and occupied by architect Craig Steely and his wife, the rest of the home is just as warm and tranquil aptly named Lavaflow 2.

Source: https://www.dwell.com/article/20-bathrooms-with-transformative-tiles-a6a7bdc4

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The 50 Best interiors websites

From high style to retro chic and chintz, we find the finest websites to inspire and indulge your love of design as you prepare to give your home a make-over

Blogs:

Sania Pell

saniapell.com/athomeblog

Author and designer Sania Pell has a degree in textile design and has worked for the likes of Elle Deco, Marks & Spencer and The Conran Shop as a stylist and creative consultant. Her blog is an invaluable source of tips and advice from an experienced professional and a step beyond what most bloggers are able to offer.

Remodelista

remodelista.com

Part magazine, part sourcebook, Remodelista has editorial contacts worldwide and its mix of stories reflect this global reach. Along with beautiful homes, it features new shops, the best products from lighting to loo roll holders, and plenty of get-the-look advice – all on a global scale. If you see something you like you can click and buy too.

Design Squish

blog.designsquish.com

This photographically led blog finds its inspiration in the natural world and has an emphasis on sustainable and eco-friendly art and design. US based, its images have a nostalgic retro quality. The blog’s tranquil vibe is subtly inspiring; don’t be surprised if you emerge from a trawl with a whole new aesthetic for making-over that troublesome space at home.

Bloesem Living

bloesemdesign.com

Visually adept blog by Dutch graphic designer Irene Hoofs, who now lives in Malaysia. There’s a slight bias toward the clean lines and quirky style of Dutch design, which is no bad thing, and a mix of homes, stores and beautifully curated image galleries. There’s also a sister site, Bloesemkids (bkids.typepad.com) dedicated to craft projects for children.

Houzz

houzz.com

Claiming to have more than 1.5 million images, this is the site to visit when you’re looking for ideas and inspiration. With designs that cover every room in the house and a function that lets you save your favourite pictures for future reference, you can soon narrow down your personal style. If you can’t find a bath, bed or bookcase you love here, then it probably doesn’t exist.

Home Shopping Spy

homeshoppingspy.com

Penned by Ideal Home’s style editor, this is a good site to visit when you’re looking for shopping inspiration. The blog features a nicely edited selection of new products, stores and decorating tips and is ideal when you’ve had enough of the personal updates to which some blogs are prone.

National Trust treasure hunt

nttreasurehunt.wordpress.com

One for those of you with a penchant for history and restoration, this site celebrates the homes belonging to the National Trust with a behind-the-scenes look at the objects in them, the stories behind them, and the renovation and work that goes into preserving them. All that marble, brass and paisley is also sure to inspire you to similarly grand ideas.

Fine Little Day

finelittleday.com

This Swedish blog has a handcrafted Scandi aesthetic. Forget blonde wood floors and white walls, this is more nostalgic, with plenty of vintage touches and a homely feel. Handmade objects do feature heavily but there’s nothing church-fair about it; instead it’s stylish, warm, inclusive and personal.

Abigail Ahern.

abigailahern.wordpress.com

British interior style maven Abigail Ahern is also a prolific blogger, with regular updates and a personal style to her writing that matches her quirky approach to interiors. With lots of inspiring images and posts ranging from before and afters to ‘how-tos’ and source-book pieces, it’s definitely worth a regular follow.

Design Sponge

designsponge.com

The beauty of the internet is that you can now indulge your curiosity about other people’s lives on a global scale. Design Sponge, with its readers’ before and after DIY shots and broad mix of Stateside homes, is a great source of inspiration and a visit is pretty much guaranteed to evoke a moment of house and lifestyle envy.

Print & Pattern

printpattern.blogspot.co.uk

This British-based blog does what it says on the tin. A site dedicated to all things print and pattern related, it’s worth a visit if you’re looking for inspiration to liven up a space with bright engaging products ranging across everything from textiles to wallpaper, tableware, books and illustrations.

Frolic!

frolic-blog.com

Founded by Portland, Oregon-based floral stylist Chelsea Fuss, this lifestyle and interiors site is rooted in floral inspiration but avoids feeling twee. It has a laid-back vibe and its focus on using flowers in display, pattern, fabric or scent is perfect for those moments when you need a reminder of how beautiful and varied flowers can be.

Daisy Fay Interiors

daisyfayinteriors.blogspot.com

This UK based blog is all about shopping, with posts on stores, markets, sales and car boot sales and covering everything from furniture to arts and crafts. There are occasional international posts too and links through to online stores so you can buy those pieces that take your fancy.

Desire to inspire

desiretoinspire.net

With co-creators as far apart as Ottawa, Canada and Brisbane, Australia, Desire to Inspire knows no global boundaries and this is reflected in its content. With homes from Scandinavia to Australia and beyond and the benefit of two, rather than a single editorial eye on the content, there’s plenty of style inspiration here.

Lobster and Swan

blog.lobsterandswan.com

A UK based blog by a graphic designer-cum-stylist, Lobster and Swan is part personal diary, part styling haven and records the author’s life and home renovation, along with a series of inspiring snaps and styling tips. There’s also a link to the author’s Etsy shop, if you want to buy into her style in your own home.

 

Interior stores:

Rockett St George

rockettstgeorge.co.uk

This site sells everything from tea-towels to sofas – via pineapple lamps. It does a nice line in industrial chic, has an element of the vintage to it and eschews ubiquitous minimalist styling for a more opulent, personal and lived-in feel. If eclectic urban luxury is your vibe, you really can’t go far wrong here.

Loop the Loop

looptheloop.co.uk

Run by Laura and Adam Norgan this website stocks contemporary pieces including an interesting range of vintage one-offs, industrial lighting, mirrors, shelving and storage. Much of their stock has a simpler look or industrial providence.

St Jude’s Fabrics

stjudesfabrics.co.uk

This web shop from printmaker and textile designer Angie Lewin specialises in fabrics and printed items like wallpaper, though you’ll also find some furniture upholstered in her signature prints. Along with Lewin’s work you can also buy pieces by young designers she works with and products are of superior quality across the board.

Bold & Noble

boldandnoble.com

For affordable hand printed screen prints, many with a typographical bent, it’s worth a visit to Bold & Noble. There’s a broad selection of styles – we especially like the typographical maps of Britain and London – and an eco-conscious ethos, with all designs printed on recycled card.

Bodie and Fou

bodieandFou.com

There’s a stylish Scandi aesthetic to the products at Bodie and Fou with the odd quirky touch that adds a welcome hint of eccentricity as well. With a pleasing global mix and a tasteful yet not overtly designer feel, there’s plenty you’ll covet for your home.

Starling Store

starlingstore.com

Newly launched this summer, Starling Store offers a wide range of products with a contemporary aesthetic: think pops of bright colours, geometric patterns and natural materials. Founder Nicola Eslick has a background in fashion design that’s evident in the on-trend feel.

Theo

theo-theo.com

Theo founder Thorsten van Elten has a nose for emerging young designers so you’ll often find pieces by those set for the big time. Buy them up while they’re still relatively inexpensive. Products range from lighting and furniture to textiles and accessories.

RE

re-foundobjects.com

Eclectic is the best word to sum up the personal and original pieces, with everything from a hanging bunch of shells to vintage glass and recycled cardboard lights. Browsing here is half the fun; we like the vintage tattoo brandy glass vases, from £25.

Not on the high street

notonthehighstreet.com

A market place site selling the work of artists, designers and curators from across Britain. The quality of the work is generally good and the site is especially strong on artwork and personalised designs, making it good for wedding pressies and other gifts.

Rose & Grey

roseandgrey.co.uk

You’ll find furniture, wallpaper, cushions, mirrors, prints and more at this online store. The style is a feminine mix of British with a hint of salvage and vintage about it too: choose vintage leather armchairs, heart-shaped glass dishes and Union Jack rugs.

 

Bargain hunters:

Ikea hackers

ikeahackers.net

People from around the world share their improvements to Ikea pieces on this site, be it through adding new elements or simply changing the colour or upholstery. If you’re feeling creative, are a dab hand with power tools and not fazed at the thought of constructing flat-pack furniture, this site is a great source of inspiration.

Etsy

etsy.com

With more than 900,000 stalls selling 18 million handmade and vintage pieces, this global online market place is diverse, good value and very addictive. Many overseas sellers will ship to the UK and there are UK retailers on board too. With its creative ethos it’s a step above eBay in quality.

Oxfam

oxfam.org.uk

No need to brave the crowds at a car boot sale when you can shop here for second hand bric-a-brac. Items are predominantly ceramics, textiles and smaller objects, and while the days of finding designer cast offs at give-away prices are over, you can find interesting objects and support Oxfam’s work at the same time.

Gumtree

gumtree.com

Remember the days of browsing classified ads in newspapers and magazines? Well Gumtree is the online version, a fixed-price secondhand market place (there are no auctions or bids here) with sellers from 48 cities across the UK and 34,000 new ads every day. Good for buying and selling second-hand furniture, often at very reasonable prices.

Out of the dark

outofthedark.org.uk

Out of the Dark is a social enterprise that works with young people from disadvantaged backgrounds to revamp and restore salvaged furniture. The pieces it creates are stylish and covetable – colourful recreations of mid-century items – and you can also commission specific designs on pieces of your own.

 

Specialist sites:

Surface View

surfaceview.co.uk

If you’re looking for a wall covering beyond the ordinary, Surface View is the site to visit. The company has a vast collection of images ranging from paintings from The National Gallery’s collection to Getty Images photography and Haynes Manuals graphics and more. All can be re-mastered to your exact dimensions and then fixed to your wall in all their oversized glory. The biggest challenge is deciding on an image.

Labour and Wait

labourandwait.co.uk

Cleaning the house is probably the least appealing part of being a grown-up homeowner, but Labour and Wait at least makes it feel a little more stylish, with utilitarian and timeless designs including wooden dusting brushes, ostrich feather dusters and linen floor cloths alongside kitchen, bathroom and outdoor items – all with a pleasingly practical feel.

Culture Label

culturelabel.com

The site to visit if you’re looking for anything art and culture related, from limited edition prints to products by young and established designers. Prices range from under £50 to more than £500 and the site is well curated and worth an exploration even if you’re not in the market for a specific piece.

Sofa

sofa.com

This site makes buying a sofa online simple and low risk. Choose your favourite style, see how it looks in different fabrics and then order. The company takes responsibility for getting the sofa into your house (if it doesn’t fit it’s not your problem) and will also take the sofa back on return within 14 days, no questions asked, if there’s anything at all you don’t like about it.

The Holding Company

theholdingcompany.co.uk

Whatever you need to store and however large or small your storage space is, you will find an ingenious solution on this site. From storage baskets to hat boxes, shoe racks to shelving, the site has a wide selection across all price points. It may not always be the most uber.stylish but it is certainly functional.

 

Splurge out:

The Shop Floor Project

theshopfloorproject.com

Founded by mother and daughter team Denise and Samatha Allan, The Shop Floor Project is an online shop-cum-gallery. The Allans are artists themselves and all the objects they sell have artisanal touches, from hand-woven textiles to hand-beaten metal sconces, beautiful ceramics and more. The design of the site, a two-dimensional meander through the actual store, is visually pleasing as well.

Darkroom

darkroomlondon.com

Strong graphic prints, bold coloured ceramics and designer pieces by British craftspeople predominate at Darkroom London. There’s a confidence and very specific aesthetic to the collection – it’s contemporary but not faddish and the pieces you find here will make a strong statement for years to come.

David Mellor

davidmellordesign.com

David Mellor is a key figure in British design. Born in Sheffield, he is (perhaps inevitably) especially famous for his cutlery design and this site does his beautiful ranges proud. It also features kitchen gadgets and glassware from the Mellor brand and others and is the go-to place for stylish, top-end kitchen accessories.

Rowen & Wren

rowenandwren.co.uk

Beautifully styled and photographed in a muted palette of blues and greys, homewares site Rowen & Wren is a feast for the eyes. The site and the products (predominantly textiles, ceramics and furniture) are all about understated, refined living and the site offers up a view of an aspirational lifestyle most of us can only daydream about.

Skandium

skandium.com

This is the place to go for all things Scandinavian, from the iconic Egg chair by Danish designer Arne Jacobsen to a piece of glassware by Finnish brand Iittala and textile creations by Stig Lindberg for Design House Stockholm.

 

Vintage:

Fears and Kahn

fearsandkahn.co.uk

While many vintage sites focus on mid-century pieces that soon begin to blend into one another, Fears and Kahn rocks a different aesthetic: glam, gutsy, bright and bling: think 70s and 80s pieces with plenty of shimmering glass and brass. Alongside furniture there are design objects, lighting and art. Prices are high but the pieces are covetable.

Skinflint Design

skinflintdesign.co.uk

If you’re looking for vintage lighting and in particular lighting with an industrial heritage, Skinflint Design is the site to visit. There’s a wide selection from across Europe, with a particular focus on eastern European factory pieces and vintage British industrial designs.

Source Antiques

source-antiques.co.uk

Architectural salvage site Source Antiques specialises in reclaimed and reconditioned 1950s kitchens – bearing a striking resemblance to Paloma Faith’s kitchen in her TV cookery show. All units are fully repaired, powder-coated and polished and there’s a broad selection to choose from. Other items, including lighting, furniture, mirrors and garden pieces, are also available.

Winter’s Moon

wintersmoon.co.uk

Winter’s Moon is worth a visit for its broad range of furniture and smaller pieces of homeware as well. The nice thing about this site is that while some products are unadulterated vintage, others have been nicely tarted up; you’ll find sofas with new upholstery and lamp shades in vintage fabrics which will save you the work of doing so at home yourself.

The OK Corral

theokcorral.co.uk

The OK Corral is a good site if you’re looking for a smaller item for your home or a vintage gift for a friend. Many products are priced under £10 and there is a wide selection available, including ceramics, kitchenware, paintings, books and glass as well.

Retrouvious

retrouvious.com

Salvage specialist, Retrouvious has an ever-changing stock of pieces including architectural salvage (fireplaces, windows, doors, metalwork) and reclaimed furniture. There is also a design service if you’re looking for some professional help in achieving the stylish salvaged look at home.

The Modern Warehouse

themodernwarehouse.com

If mid-century Scandinavian style is your thing pay a visit to The Modern Warehouse for a good selection by big name designers. All pieces are sold in tip-top condition and many have been re-upholstered in period tones and fabrics. You may pay extra for the big names but this furniture is certainly a cut above average in quality.

The Mint List

themintlist.com

This online interiors store sells vintage furniture, antiques, home accessories, upcycled pieces and original art from a growing collection of independent sellers. The owners spend much of their time trawling flea-markets, galleries and dealers to present a unique collection of items with a vintage flavour.

Eclectic Chair Upholstery

eclectic-chair.com

Eclectic Chair does pretty much what its name suggests. You will can find a wide variety of vintage chairs here, all of which have been upholstered in unusual, often vintage, fabrics. There’s also a range of cushions made from scarves, textiles and Welsh tapestries. Prices range from £25 for a cushion to £1,500 for a 1970s sofa.

Emma Mason

emmamason.co.uk

Visit the Emma Mason online gallery to find work by talented British printmakers. Although the gallery represents many contemporary artists, it actually specialises in post war prints, selling work by big names like Richard Bawden and Robert Tavener. As these are prints, prices are generally relatively manageable. You can expect to pay from around £300 for a piece by a more established name and £65 to £100 for works by lesser known yet emerging artists.

Best for… Wall coverings

surfaceview.co.uk

Those after a bespoke wall-piece from a vast collection (National Gallery to Getty Images) need look no further.

Best for… Aspirational buys

rowenandwren.co.uk

This beautifully styled site is an understated feast for the eyes and boasts a refined collection of ceramics, textiles and furniture.

Best for… Keeping it simple

sofa.com

Makes buying a sofa online as easy as 123: simply choose your preferred style and fabric and click to order.

Best for… Unusual prints

emmamason.co.uk

The online gallery specialises in works from British print-makers – both emerging and more established.

 

Source: http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/the-50-best-interiors-websites-8798668.html

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7 Real Homes that Master the Art of Organization

It’s easy to spend an entire day clicking through photos of gorgeous houses and apartments and finding decor inspiration, but what about when it comes to organizing? There are beautiful, clever ways to store your things that you may not have even thought of yet. From the simple use of space underneath furniture to entire walls dedicated to storing items and showing off books and decor, here are seven smart organization solutions from real homes that will leave you ready to tidy up and declutter your entire space.

Amanda and Mike’s IKEA-Hacked Playroom

Amanda and Mike hacked IKEA bookcases to make the sleek storage benches above in their son’s playroom. The result? Tons of seating, plenty of space to stow away things in bins, and an impeccably organized play space.

Farida’s Impressively Tidy At-Home Library

If Farida’s wall of bookcases doesn’t inspire you, we’re not sure what will—and not just because of all the books. The expertly organized bins on the bottom shelf and the top of the units balances out and makes great use of the space.

Courtney’s Smart Use of Storage Furniture

Courtney Quinn’s bright, artful apartment already looks tidy on first glance, but what we love most is her clever use of a coffee table that contains hidden storage space inside and folds out as a desk when she has work to do.

Jackie’s Cleverly Organized Studio Divider

With this IKEA Kallax shelving unit, Jackie not only gives herself a beautiful space to store and show off her things, she also smartly divides up her studio to give herself a more private bedroom area.

Stephanie’s Enviably Neat Closet Space

Blogger Stephanie Sterjovski’s combination closet/office space—featuring open shelving for organizing and showing off bags and shoes as well as plenty of hanging space and drawers for tucking things out of sight—is the stuff of dreams. Click here to see the rest of the condo.

Shannon and Mike’s Simple Storage Solutions

It’s simple, but beautifully effective—Shannon and Mike took advantage of the space under their table (which also has storage options) by sliding in plain white bins that almost blend into the wall behind it. Hidden in plain sight!

Kate’s Beautifully Organized Makeup Collection

Blogger Kate La Vie’s apartment tour reveals an incredibly tidy vanity table (and a separate makeup collection) so organized, it’ll inspire you to revamp your own. The rest of her space is equally gorgeous and neat—seriously, even the plants look organized.

 

Source: http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/simple-organizing-ideas-to-steal-from-these-7-real-homes-240899

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14 Totally Unique (and Totally Brilliant) Uses for Duct Tape

If I had to pick one home repair tool to take to a deserted island, I’d bring duct tape—that miracle stuff that can patch up just about anything. The extra-sticky, plastic-coated tape was developed during World War II as a water-resistant tool to be used in the field. Since then, it’s been used to mend everything from broken car windows, to leaky pipes, to the Mars living quarters in “The Martian.” Indeed, it’s so damn versatile, it’s become a cultural trope and subject of odd fascination, leading to scores of books and websites.

So it’s time to get with the program: The uses for duct tape extend way beyond simply adhering or repairing.

When you’re in a pinch, or in need of a cheap and efficient home hack, reach for your roll and go nuts!

Here are some surprising ways to use the tape around the house.

  1. Remove pet hair: Make a DIY lint (and pet hair) remover by wrapping duct tape—sticky side up—around a paint roller. Then go to town on your sofas and corduroy pants.
  2. Weatherproof windows and doors: Tape along the gaps of windows and doors to prevent cold air from infiltrating during the winter. You’ll be warmer and cut down on energy bills to boot! However, do not try to protect your windows from a hurricane by putting duct tape in the shape of an X on them. The National Hurricane Center debunked this popular emergency prep myth; it’s a waste of time and can actually create larger, deadlier shards of glass.
  3. Wrap handles: Duct tape wound around hammer handles and other tools will give you a better grip.
  4. Temporarily replace a roof shingle: If you have a leak and no extra shingles, cut a shingle-sized piece of plywood and wrap it with duct tape. Push it into place for a temporary fix.
  5. Grab ceiling cobwebs: Wrap a broom handle with duct tape, sticky side up, and swipe high cobwebs, which will stick to the tape.
  6. Keep remotes from disappearing: Duct tape remote controls to large kids’ building blocks, which prevents the clickers from disappearing into the couch. And if your kids love to rip off the battery covers, tape them shut.
  7. Prevent furniture scuff marks: Place a tiny square of duct tape on the bottom of chair legs to prevent scratching and scuffing floors.
  8. Waterproof shoes: Cover the tops and sides of running shoes to protect them from puddles.
  9. Fly catchers: Hang strips of duct tape from your patio ceiling to catch flying pests, which will land on and stick to the tape.
  10. Secure cords: Duct tape cords in your home office to the floor to prevent tripping hazards.
  11. Locate garden tools: Wrap brightly colored duct tape around garden tool handles, which will make them easier to find when hidden in your garden.
  12. Fix a leak: Repair garden hose leaks by wrapping the break with duct tape. Extend the tape 2 or 3 inches before and after the break. It won’t last forever, but it’ll last long enough to water the garden.
  13. Patch siding: If a tree limb has ripped your home’s siding, cover it with duct tape, which will last until you can get it properly fixed.
  14. Repair ripped screens: In a pinch, you can duct tape together ripped screens to keep mosquitoes out of your porch or house.