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No Room to Work at Home? Offices that Fit into the Smallest of Spaces

Sometimes, sitting on the couch with your computer propped in your lap just doesn’t cut it. When it comes to really getting work done, there’s nothing like an actual, dedicated workspace. And you may think that living in a small space means you don’t have room for a desk, but that’s where you’d be wrong. Check out these ten examples of workspaces cleverly squeezed into the smallest of spaces.

Above: If you have a particularly wide hallway or entryway, why not add a desk? This little workspace, from Entrance (via My Domaine), makes use of a vintage desk (or is that maybe a small hall table?), but if space is tight, a wall-mounted desk would work great, as well.

(Image credit: Julia Robbs for Cup of Jo)

Wall mounted desks are one of my favorite solutions for small spaces: they take up way less space than their four-legged counterparts, and you can put one practically anywhere. In this photo from Cup of Jo, a deep shelf mounted under the windows adds an attractive workspace to a sunny little spot.

(Image credit: Stadshem)

Corners are also a great spot for wall-mounted desks, as seen in this photo from Stadshem, via SF Girl by Bay.

Here’s an even more diminutive corner desk from Inside Out, cut into a custom shape to make the best possible use of the corner while taking up as little space as possible.

(Image credit: Kate Collins Interiors)

A nightstand that doubles as a desk is a great solution for a small bedroom. Image from Kate Collins Interiors.

(Image credit: Kim Lucian)

Got a small, unused niche in your living room or bedroom that’s not big enough for a dresser or bookcase? Turn it into a tiny home office, like Myka and George did in their California home.

If your lease allows, mounting shelves above the desk is a great way to boost storage in your office nook. Julie and Jasper added shelves and a wall-mounted desk to make this niche especially useful.

(Image credit: Nancy Mitchell)

Let’s say hanging shelves isn’t an option for you. Well, a leaning desk, like this one from West Elm, might just be the solution you need. Jessica added one to her NYC apartment, with a fabric-wrapped panel behind for pinning inspirations.

(Image credit: Jocelyn Baun)

From Design*Sponge, here’s a clever solution that makes use of the depth of a windowsill. The computer sits in the window, while a wall-mounted shelf holds the keyboard and mouse. Add a rolling cart for storage, and you’ve got a complete desk setup that barely takes up any square footage at all.

(Image credit: Nancy Mitchell)

A vintage school desk is small enough to fit inobtrusively into a corner of your living room, but just the right size for an occasional workstation. Milo and Jessica use this spot as a workspace, and store their computer when it’s not in use to avoid visual clutter.

 

Source: http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/no-room-to-work-at-home-offices-that-fit-into-the-smallest-of-spaces-240143

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Seven Trends to Try at Home This Fall

As designers, editors, and homeowners descended on New York’s Pier 94 for the Architectural Digest Design Show last week, AD‘s market team was on the lookout for the best trends. With myriad exhibitors across multiple categories, the fair had no shortage of inspiration. But once the dust settles, what will last? Below, our market editors share the seven trends they think we’ll be seeing more of this year.

 

Abstract Art–Inspired Pattern

Abstract Art–Inspired Pattern

Taking art off the canvas and onto the floor and walls, abstract accents add modern and playful pops of color to any room. Clockwise from top left: wallpaper by Wallpaper Projects, Aldrin rug by Woven Concepts, Tarmack rug by Inigo Elizalde Rugs, Of Quartz It Is wallpaper by Flavor Paper, and Zepher wallpaper by Flat Vernacular.
Gilded Accents

Gilded Accents

We can’t take our eyes off these gorgeous gilded and golden accents sure to elevate any interior space. Clockwise from top left: stacking candle holders by Fort Standard, wall treatments by Atelier Premiere, side table by A Space, and drinks table by Erickson Aesthetics.
Brightly Colored Kitchen and Bath

Brightly Colored Kitchen and Bath

With spring in the air, everyone is thinking color. We saw this trend most surprisingly in the kitchen and bath categories, with everything from stoves to vanities in kicky hues. Clockwise from top left: Hestan Outdoor Deluxe Grill with Side Burner, SMEG Portofino Range (coming in September), Majestic Techno Collection range in Emerald by ILVE, Dual Electric Double Self Clean Oven by Bertazzoni, and Amora vanity in navy by Ronbow.
Cutout Details

Cutout Details

See-through circles and graphic cutouts add instant appeal and a touch of whimsy to larger furniture pieces and smaller tabletop accessories alike. Clockwise from right: Bower’s wool and walnut Ring Chair, hand-carved Bangle table from Tucker Robbins, rainbow-colored Lattice Geo placemats by Echo, and Vermont Modern’s Bloom pendants by Hubbardton Forge.
Green

Green

Martyn Lawrence Bullard summed it up when asked for his favorite trend right now: green! From the kitchen and bath to the den and dining room, the sophisticated and saturated hue has found its way into all areas of home decor. Clockwise from right: Artistic Tile’s Triangulum in malachite glass and brass, Pyramids marble side table by Erickson Aesthetics, Bastet stool by Ped Woodworking, and Matthew Ward’s playful ceramics.
Organic Shapes

Organic Shapes

This spring it’s all about movement! Fluid lines and abstract forms created some of the most dynamic works at the show. Clockwise from top: Patrick Weder’s Honeycomb light sculpture, Snaka Waka Cameroon carvings from Tucker Robbins, Marco Guglielmino’s electric light design, Table No. 5 by J.M. Syzmanskifeaturing iron powder and magnets, and Tubular Group 01 by Ara Levon Thorose.
Light, Natural Wood

Light, Natural Wood

Chic, bright, and airy, light-colored wood provides stability without weighing down a room, and it’s more modern than its heavier counterpart. Clockwise from top left: counterweight light by Fort Standard, Una chair by Estudio Persona, RB bench by Woodsport, stool in Montgomery Ash by Crump & Kwash,chair by Wren and Cooper.
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Here Are Pantone’s Color Trend Predictions for 2018

We’re only a few months into 2017, but that hasn’t stopped Pantone from looking inside their colorful crystal ball. At the International Home & Housewares Show in Chicago this week, the international authority on color gave attendees a peek into what’s on trend for 2018.

While we still have about eight months of Greenery (whether you like it or not) until they announce the new Color of the Year, Pantone Color Institute Executive Director Leatrice Eiseman was at the show sharing color and design trends for 2018.

“Metallics we know are classic,” Eiseman said, according to trade publication Home Accents Today. “But they have really moved over into neutrals.” We certainly see no signs of these shiny metals waning. Same goes for the iridescent trend: “The human eye can absolutely not avoid” anything iridescent, pearlized or translucent, since being intrigued by shimmering, shiny objects is “intrinsic to human development.”

In terms of color, the trend is continuing away from pastels (like 2016’s Colors of the Year Serenity and Rose Quartz) to more vibrant hues—though they won’t entirely fade by 2018. “Intense colors seem to be a natural application of our intense lifestyles and thought processes these days,” she said.

 
Top row: Vedure, Playful, Discretion, TECH-nique. Bottom row: Far-Fetched, Resourceful, Intricacy, Intensity

(Image credit: Pantone)

Pantone also revealed eight palettes for home and interiors for the upcoming year at the Housewares show. They are:

Vedure—Nature inspired hues, like celery, robin’s egg blue, and berry purple. “This palette is so symbolic of health,” said Eiseman.

Playful—Definitely not a palette to take too seriously, this one brings the fun—especially with colors like Minion Yellow and Lime Popsicle.

Descretion—Pretty much the opposite of Playful, this is mostly subtle, desaturated hues like Elderberry and Hawthorne Rose. “Pink has developed more power than ever before,” said Eiseman.

TECH-nique—A nod to technology, with bright turquoise, pink, and purple hues, and balanced with Brilliant White and Frosted Almond.

Far-Fetched—This palette “reaches out and embraces many different cultures,” said Eiseman. Lots of warm, earthy hues like Rooibos Tea and Cornsilk Yellow.

Resourceful—Mostly made up of complementary colors blue and orange, “it combines warm and cool tones that you just can’t avoid looking at it.”

Intricacy—Full of those new neutral metallics, with a pop of Holly Berry Red and yellow Sulfur for drama.

Intensity—This one conveys “a certain strength, power, depth and sophistication,” said Eiseman, despite being an eclectic collection of colors. Black and gold balance the varying hues.

 

Source: http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/here-are-pantones-color-trend-predictions-for-2018-243598

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20 things every twenty-something should have in their home

Mostly copper, marble and velvet

1. Pineapple accessories

2. Tiny cactuses/plants/succulents… in a variety of different pots. Bonus if they hang.

3. A fluffy geometric rug

4. A framed quote… (preferably in copper)

 

5. A marble table… preferably with geometric legs, placed strategically on a neutral geometric rug.

6. Copper everything… usually in the form of but not limited to: frames, lamps, mirrors, pots, vases and candle holders.

7. Lots of pointless throw cushions… well, the LOOK good, but they will prevent you from being able to sit down properly.

8. A statement velvet chair… because PRETTY.

9. A photo wall… made up of prints and posters (and probably a framed quote).

10. An Instagrammable desk set-up… even if you don’t work from home.

11. Funky bathroom tiles… essential for ‘from where I stand’ grams.

12. Geometric lights with exposed bulbs… in white, black or copper only.

13. Coffee table books… preferably Chanel or Vogue.

14. A random flamingo… can be in the form of a lamp, cushion, salt and pepper shakers or just a pointless ornament.

15. This palm tree from Ikea… bonus points if you put it in a wicker basket.

16. A lightbox…

17. Palm print/cactus cushions… (or chairs, or lamp shades, or bedding).

18. A statement mirror…

19. A large floor lamp…

20. A star lamp/wall light…

Source: http://www.cosmopolitan.com/uk/worklife/a9168199/twenty-something-interior-home-inspiration/

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Next Wave Natural: The New Way to Do Wooden Kitchen Cabinets

We predicted that natural materials and warmer finishes would rule the kitchen in 2017 (here are our other guesses). One way we’re seeing this natural-material trend play out, thanks in part to the popularity of minimalism, is with unpainted, unfinished wooden cabinets. The casual look combines the sleek style we expect in contemporary kitchens with the natural warmth of wood—just another reason we’re adding “kitchen renovation” to our home wish lists.

(Image credit: Bungalow5)

The Danish company Dinesen, makers of beautiful plank wood flooring, decided to use the natural material throughout the entire room, covering both the walls and cabinets. The result is minimalist, yet warm and inviting. See the rest of the room on Bungalow5.

We’ve talked before about the beauty of mismatched kitchens, and the one above from Shoot Factory featured on DecorPad is no exception. I’m now convinced that textured wood below, glass cabinets above, and marble in the middle is the recipe for a flawless kitchen.

(Image credit: Domino)

It’s no surprise that this relaxed kitchen is nestled inside a quaint 1920s storybook-style home in Oakland Hills. If you’re a fan of butcher block counter, this kitchen shows us you don’t have to stop there—extend the look to the cabinets, as well. Tour the rest of this fairy-tale home over on Domino.

(Image credit: Nordic Design)

If you’re looking to channel cozy cabin vibes, draw inspiration from this Norwegian kitchen found on Nordic Design. All wood everything looks great with a long horizontal window that seriously improves your view while washing dishes.

Matching wooden cabinets and window frames pull the room together, while clean white subway tiles keep the look fresh. To maintain flat-front cabinets’ sleek appearance, pair them with recessed hardware that blends in seamlessly. Every single room of this home styled by Tina Hellberg for Elle Decoration deserves a spot on your Pinterest board—explore them all on Oracle Fox.

(Image credit: The Style Files)

The reclaimed wood, substantial metal hardware and stainless steel range hood in this kitchen from The Style Files will make fans of warm industrial style happy.

(Image credit: Design Milk)

In this New Zealand home by MRTN Architects featured on Design Milk, pale wood cabinets join forces with black hardware for a striking study in contrasts.

(Image credit: deVOL)

In this deVOL kitchen, natural slated cabinet fronts sit beside those with a dark wood stain. Consider skipping the hardware altogether and cut holes in the cabinet fronts for a minimalist alternative.

(Image credit: Swoon Editions)

While your first instinct may be to balance wooden cabinets with crisp white walls, critics of the all-white kitchen will be pleased to see how beautifully jewel-tones complement reclaimed wood cabinets and shelves in Swoon Edition‘s showroom, above.

 

Source: http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/10-beautiful-kitchens-rocking-natural-wood-cabinets-241030

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PSA: This Is What Guests Really Notice in Your Home

What is the first thing you do when getting your house ready for guests to come over? Think of it as a hypothetical scenario—your co-worker has decided to drop by your house with 15 minutes warning. Do you hide away your pile of dirty clothes? Light a candle? Dim the lights? Throw dirty dishes in the dishwasher? What about when your relatives come to stay with you for an extended period of time? Do you repaint a room that’s been bothering you? Hang art that’s been leaning against your baseboards for too long? Do you refresh your space with plants and flowers?

When faced with having to turn a home into the best version of itself for dinner parties, casual get-togethers, and overnight guests, we often discover just how real the struggle is. To find out once and for all what people actually notice in our homes, we asked our Instagram followers. With an overwhelming 120 answers, our readers shed light on this pressing issue. Here is the definitive guide to what your guests definitely see in your space (that you probably don’t). 

COHESIVENESS AND FLOW

how to stage your home
PHOTO: Courtesy of Elizabeth Roberts

Many of our readers pointed out the flow and furniture placement in a home to be the first thing they noticed: “Certain things can make me feel uncomfortable in a space, like a poor furniture layout or pictures hung too high,” said one reader. “I often find I am unconsciously fixing rooms in my mind. It just happens.” Many readers admitted to being guilty of mentally rearranging other people’s furniture. Others noticed how cohesive the flow was from one room to the next.

Quick fix: Limit your color scheme from room to room. When in doubt, edit things out of your space to see if the flow improves.

CLEANLINESS AND CLUTTER

how to stage your home
PHOTO: Courtesy of Studio McGee

If you get stressed out about friends and family seeing your real-life mess when popping by unannounced, turns out you may have reason to. Another sticky point for many readers: cleanliness, tidiness, and organization. For some readers, it rubbed their neat-freak tendencies the wrong way. For others, it made them feel better about their own mess.

Quick fix: When having visitors over, make a point to tidy up any clutter and give your space a quick clean.

Murchison-Hume Counter Safe Surface Spray ($10)

ART AND BOOKS

how to stage your home
PHOTO: Courtesy of Katie Hodges

People want to know what kind of culture you consume—from what art is displayed on your walls to what books or magazines you read. “I usually notice what’s on the shelves or the walls first,” said @bratbratcity. More specifically, our readers pointed out that art should say a lot about its owners, and it shouldn’t be generic.

Quick fix: Edit your bookcase to display the books that represent you best, and do an inventory of your art—does it actually reflect your interests and personality? If not, consider working on your art collection.

SCENTS AND SMELLS

how to stage your home
PHOTO: Tessa Neustadt; DESIGN: Katherine Carter

Does your home have an inviting scent—a luxe burning candle, perhaps, or a chicken roasting in the oven? Or does it smell like you haven’t taken out the garbage or changed the kitty litter in weeks? “Smell always triggers my memory first,” @allizonsaid. “I love when I start to memorize the smell of a friend’s home.” Conversely, readers noticed the bad smells just as much as the good ones.

Quick fix: Burn a candle 10 to 15 minutes before guests arrive, or cook something in the oven. Lastly, find the culprits that may be giving your home a funky smell, like the microwave or the garbage disposal.

LIGHT SOURCES

how to stage your home
PHOTO: Courtesy of Studio Ashby

When walking into your home, guests will most likely notice natural light, but they’ll also pick up on artificial lighting and how light is arranged around the room. “I don’t notice the fixtures, but I notice the things that illuminate and obscure a room: afternoon light pouring through windows, the gentle glow of candles, the spotlights on art, the cold halogen light, the blue light flashing from a TV screen,” said @h2cho. “The quality of light sets the mood of a space. The same space can feel cozy, massive, mysterious, familiar, enchanting, or humdrum with just a change of light.”

Quick fix: If it’s daytime, draw open your curtains and roll up your blinds. If it’s nighttime, light a few candles, dim your lights, and turn off the TV.

Norm Architects Sten Floor Lamp ( $2650 ) ($2253)

PAINT COLORS

how to stage your home
PHOTO: Courtesy of Fantastic Frank

It turns out that unless your room is a neutral white, your guests probably have strong opinions about which color you decided to paint your walls. Specifically, they aren’t a fan of red or brown walls. “It all generally hits me at once. I can get car sick if a wall is painted ‘cappuccino’,” said @virgomadnesss. “I have to rearrange in my head.”

Quick fix: If you’ve fallen out of love with your paint choices, try these designer-approved neutral hues.

Benjamin Moore Normandy ($37)

PLANTS AND GREENERY

how to stage your home
PHOTO: Courtesy of Studio Ashby

Finally, guests often notice your plants, flowers, and greenery, or how much of it is visible from the inside. “I’m such a huge plant mom that I always look to see what life others are cultivating in their space,” said @littledove.

Quick fix: Get rid of any dying plants in your space, and refresh your main rooms with fresh flowers of branches.

Source: http://www.mydomaine.com/how-to-stage-your-home/slide12

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Don’t Waste an Inch: Ideas for Using a Really Narrow Room

Have you got a landing, a spare room, a bit of hallway—any particularly small sliver of space in your home that’s searching for its purpose? Narrow rooms can pose a special challenge, but this doesn’t mean that you can’t make the most of that space. Here’s a little inspiration for getting the most out of a (really, really) narrow room.

(Image credit: Fantastic Frank)

Since that’s the idea of this post, I thought I’d start with the very narrowest of these rooms: this little nook from Fantastic Frank, which is not much wider than a hallway. These homeowners have managed to squeeze a lot of utility out of this tiny space: wall mounted shelves provide storage without taking up floor space, and a particularly deep shelf functions as a workspace. The lounge chair pulls out to a bed, so the space can function as a guest room, too.

(Image credit: Apartment Therapy )

An antique desk is the perfect solution for turning this little nook from Jamie and Byron’s San Francisco house into a cozy workspace.

(Image credit: David Boyle)

Even the narrowest of rooms can make a great workspace, as evidenced by this interior from David Boyle. Shelves don’t have to be particularly deep to hold standard paperbacks: the shelves on the left are made from standard lumber and are (I’m guessing) only 5.5 inches deep.

(Image credit: Nightingale Design)

If you have enough space you can squeeze in a workspace and a cozy spot for lounging, as seen in this staircase landing by Nightingale Design.

(Image credit: A Cup of Jo)

In this sunny spot from A Cup of Jo, a wall-mounted shelf/desk and a built-in bench make the most of a narrow space.

(Image credit: Robert McKinley)

Sectional sofas can make a surprisingly good solution for smaller spaces, like this one from Robert McKinley. If you can’t find a sectional that’s just the right shape or size, try piecing together a modular sofa.

(Image credit: Lonny)

In a space that’s too narrow to place two sofas across from one another, you can still create a conversational grouping with an upholstered bench. Image from Lonny.

(Image credit: Dwell)

In this space from Dwell, double workspaces make the most of a narrow room.

(Image credit: Country Living)

If your room is just a little bit wider (like this stair landing from Country Living) you may be able to squeeze in a full-sized couch and a desk. That’s multitasking at its best.

Source: http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/dont-waste-an-inch-ideas-for-using-a-really-narrow-room-241147

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20 Bathrooms With Transformative Tiles

The right tiles can transform any basic space into a breathtaking escape.

These ancient pieces—that are both decorative and functional—have stood the test of time for their ability to provide texture, color, depth, and pattern. Today, tiles rejuvenate modern floors and walls alike, particularly in bathrooms. Below are 20 examples of transformative tiles in the most rejuvenating room in the home.

Hexagonal tiles made by the Portland Cement Company continue the pattern in the bathroom, where the architect designed low drawers and cabinets that are easy for Luna to reach.
Hexagonal tiles made by the Portland Cement Company continue the pattern in the bathroom, where the architect designed low drawers and cabinets that are easy for Luna to reach.

Photo: Cedric Angeles
Husband-and-wife ceramic artists, Dear Human, baked x-shaped decals into store-bought Olympia Tile before arranging them in the kids’ bathroom. The tub is by Bette and the sink, set in a Corian countertop, is by Duravit.
Husband-and-wife ceramic artists, Dear Human, baked x-shaped decals into store-bought Olympia Tile before arranging them in the kids’ bathroom. The tub is by Bette and the sink, set in a Corian countertop, is by Duravit.

Photo: Ema Peter
The bathroom, located just adjacent to the kitchen, features a pattern of gray and turquoise tiles that climbs from the floors up the walls. They serve as a burst of color among the predominately white walls elsewhere, transforming the bathroom into one of the apartment’s most striking spaces.
The bathroom, located just adjacent to the kitchen, features a pattern of gray and turquoise tiles that climbs from the floors up the walls. They serve as a burst of color among the predominately white walls elsewhere, transforming the bathroom into one of the apartment’s most striking spaces.

The second-floor bathroom's colorful Tex tiles from Mutina sport an array of different textures for a unique tactile experience.
The second-floor bathroom’s colorful Tex tiles from Mutina sport an array of different textures for a unique tactile experience.

Photo: Brian W. Ferry
After completing the renovation of his home in Austin, Texas, photographer and designer Chase Daniel shared the final result of his bathroom. He covered the walls with triangle tiles from Fireclay Tile in the shades of Rosemary, Salton Sea, and Frost.
After completing the renovation of his home in Austin, Texas, photographer and designer Chase Daniel shared the final result of his bathroom. He covered the walls with triangle tiles from Fireclay Tile in the shades of Rosemary, Salton Sea, and Frost.

Photo: Chase Daniel
In the master bathroom, the Smiths worked with a Boston-based company, Artaic, on the mosaic tile.
In the master bathroom, the Smiths worked with a Boston-based company, Artaic, on the mosaic tile.

Photo: Ye-h Photography
The bathrooms are tiled in bright blue mosaic to offset the home’s limited materials and color palette. The sinks, toilets, and tubs are by Villeroy & Boch, while the faucets and towel rails are by Grohe and Avenir, respectively.
The bathrooms are tiled in bright blue mosaic to offset the home’s limited materials and color palette. The sinks, toilets, and tubs are by Villeroy & Boch, while the faucets and towel rails are by Grohe and Avenir, respectively.

In the tiled master bathroom, the boys get their own sink.

Photo: Bryce Duffy
White-and-blue, wood-grain–patterned UonUon tiles by 14oraitaliana line the bathroom walls in a loft above the garage.
White-and-blue, wood-grain–patterned UonUon tiles by 14oraitaliana line the bathroom walls in a loft above the garage.

Photo: Brian W. Ferry
The marble continues in a bathroom, which has a Palomba sink from Laufen.
The marble continues in a bathroom, which has a Palomba sink from Laufen.

Photo: Shannon McGrath
Bold color is embraced in the home’s first bathroom, with tilework by Trend Mosiacs. Faucets are by Grohe and vanities are by Hastings. A Flos Glo-Ball pendant light illuminates the space.
Bold color is embraced in the home’s first bathroom, with tilework by Trend Mosiacs. Faucets are by Grohe and vanities are by Hastings. A Flos Glo-Ball pendant light illuminates the space.

Amending Meeuwissen’s early request for an open bathroom space, the architects devised a more private chamber with an overhead skylight and walls in stone tile from Intercodam Tegels.
Amending Meeuwissen’s early request for an open bathroom space, the architects devised a more private chamber with an overhead skylight and walls in stone tile from Intercodam Tegels.

Photo: Kasia Gatkowska
Architect Barbara Bestor added a striped floor of Santander Granada Tile, Douglas Fir cladding, and Granada Serengeti tile flipped to create a one-of-a-kind pattern on the wall.
Architect Barbara Bestor added a striped floor of Santander Granada Tile, Douglas Fir cladding, and Granada Serengeti tile flipped to create a one-of-a-kind pattern on the wall.

A sculptural freestanding washbasin by Gessi is found in the first-floor powder room. The hex tiles are courtesy of Dear Human.
A sculptural freestanding washbasin by Gessi is found in the first-floor powder room. The hex tiles are courtesy of Dear Human.

Photo: Ema Peter
Consider this lively bathroom that sits within a recently completed waterfront home in Bridgehampton, New York. Situated on two-and-a-half acres of land with 360-degree views of the nearby bay and ocean, it's covered with brightly colored floor-to-ceiling tiles that reflect the shades of the neighboring water. One step through the sliding glass doors and you’ll find yourself on an open terrace.
Consider this lively bathroom that sits within a recently completed waterfront home in Bridgehampton, New York. Situated on two-and-a-half acres of land with 360-degree views of the nearby bay and ocean, it’s covered with brightly colored floor-to-ceiling tiles that reflect the shades of the neighboring water. One step through the sliding glass doors and you’ll find yourself on an open terrace.

The master bathroom, outfitted with Bisazza tiling, has a view of the backyard from the tub.
The master bathroom, outfitted with Bisazza tiling, has a view of the backyard from the tub.

Photo: Chad Holder
In the upper-level bathroom, tiles painstakingly fired by DeSimio cover the walls and ceiling.
In the upper-level bathroom, tiles painstakingly fired by DeSimio cover the walls and ceiling.

Photo: Paul Barbera
Wood meets white marble in this well-lit bathroom by architect Craig Steely. Contrasting materials make for a warm and serene bathing atmosphere in this Berkeley, California home.
Wood meets white marble in this well-lit bathroom by architect Craig Steely. Contrasting materials make for a warm and serene bathing atmosphere in this Berkeley, California home.

Photo: Craig Steely
Monochrome tiles define the shape of this transparent bathroom shower. Designer Stacy Zarin Goldberg of Breeze Giannasio Interiors filled this space with thick visual texture and functional designation between the shower floor and the rest of the room.
Monochrome tiles define the shape of this transparent bathroom shower. Designer Stacy Zarin Goldberg of Breeze Giannasio Interiors filled this space with thick visual texture and functional designation between the shower floor and the rest of the room.

Courtesy of Breeze Giannasio
Fiery mosaics tile the majority of this Hawaiian tub room. Built and occupied by architect Craig Steely and his wife, the rest of the home is just as warm and tranquil aptly named Lavaflow 2.
Fiery mosaics tile the majority of this Hawaiian tub room. Built and occupied by architect Craig Steely and his wife, the rest of the home is just as warm and tranquil aptly named Lavaflow 2.

Source: https://www.dwell.com/article/20-bathrooms-with-transformative-tiles-a6a7bdc4