No Comments

How to decorate your home with modern art: Tips from interior designer Simone Suss

The interior designer Simone Suss doesn’t do things by halves.

When she and her husband Rob, a financier, bought a dilapidated 1930s house in north London eight years ago, they decided to demolish it and rebuild a modern, four-storey property in its place. Planning approval was quickly secured, but the work was delayed and took three long years.

It was worth the wait. The finished house has a sleek, white-walled interior bursting with pops of colour. The wooden flooring was inspired by the Saatchi Gallery and there is some impressive contemporary art on show, but the creations of Izzy, 10, Charlie, eight, and Oliver, six, take pride of place.

simone suss home
CREDIT: INGRID RASMUSSEN

Above all, this is a family home, with a basement playroom and cinema that is perfect for weekend lounging.

Demolishing the house was a brave decision…

‘The house that originally stood here was literally the ugliest in the neighbourhood! Fortunately, the local conservation committee agreed with us, so we were given approval to knock it down and start again. What really attracted me was the plot itself, which is great. The garden is west facing, so offers beautiful light. What drew me in was that it offered space for a basement filled with natural light, so we rebuilt the house from scratch to realise my vision.’

The black- and-white hall flooring was Rob’s must-have choice, while the stairwell was positioned to spread light throughout the house
The black- and-white hall flooring was Rob’s must-have choice, while the stairwell was positioned to spread light throughout the house
CREDIT: INGRID RASMUSSEN

How would you describe your decorating style?

‘I don’t believe in sticking to rules. Some people say you can’t mix genres, but I do, frequently combining modern and historical elements in an interesting way. I like to incorporate playful elements – whether it’s art or a piece of furniture – and unusual textiles.’

In the master bedroom, a tall headboard creates a sense of luxury, while the bedside tables were designed by Simone
In the master bedroom, a tall headboard creates a sense of luxury, while the bedside tables were designed by Simone
CREDIT: INGRID RASMUSSEN

You’ve used strong pops of colour throughout the house. What do you think they bring?

‘Colour can affect how people feel and add interest to a space. For example, a bedroom in cool blues and greys is very calming. I especially love dark blue and have incorporated it into many interiors, including our movie room. Inky colours have become a new neutral, but you can use them in unexpected ways. We often do whole rooms in dark blue – ceilings, woodwork, everything.’

The quest to find the perfect material for the bathroom took ‘hundreds’ of visits to marble yards
The quest to find the perfect material for the bathroom took ‘hundreds’ of visits to marble yards
CREDIT: INGRID RASMUSSEN

Do you have a favourite room in the house?

‘I never get bored of our marble bathroom. I went to hundreds of marble yards while I was heavily pregnant with Oliver, looking for the perfect pieces. It became a bit of an obsession. I also love our kitchen, with its colourful Livia Marin mural. It really is the heart of our home and where we spend most of our time.’

The kitchen wall displays a Livia Marin mural, and a glass pendant light features replica Brazilian dolls for a fun touch
The kitchen wall displays a Livia Marin mural, and a glass pendant light features replica Brazilian dolls for a fun touch
CREDIT: INGRID RASMUSSEN

How do visitors react to the interior?

‘I’m sure it’s not to everyone’s taste, but I’ve had plenty of positive feedback – design is incredibly personal and I believe a home should reflect the people who live there. Above all, it’s a home for my family and I made sure to factor in plenty of space to enjoy together.’

the family room has a relaxed vibe
The family room has a relaxed vibe
CREDIT: INGRID RASMUSSEN

Your tips for using art in a home?

‘Again, art is very personal, so go with your gut. If you fall in love with something, or a piece has sentimental value, then why not make it a central part of your home? Put it somewhere prominent so that you can enjoy it every day. We often design entire schemes around a client’s favourite piece of art.’

Contemporary art decorates a youngster’s bedroom
Contemporary art decorates a youngster’s bedroom
CREDIT: INGRID RASMUSSEN

What is your favourite design piece?

‘Goodness, there are so many. The pink table by Yves Klein in the living room is something I never tire of looking at. I love a good Chesterfield couch – updated in a fresh fabric – and I keep returning to Anglepoise lights. They’re a modern classic.’

How was decorating your own home different to working with clients?

‘I found it much more difficult – and emotional. I’m aware of all of the different finishes and alternatives, and I’m always searching for perfection. Rob and I had a few heated debates. Fortunately, there’s always a point where my family make me step back and appreciate things.’

Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/interiors/home/how-to-decorate-your-home-with-modern-art-tips-from-interior-des/

No Comments

How to Create a Warm, Modern Space

What do couturier Oscar de la Renta, chef Andrew Carmellini, and hotel giant the Four Seasons have in common? All have commissioned New York–based design firm Meyer Davis to conceive bespoke interiors for their boutiques, restaurants, and properties. Since joining forces in 1999, Will Meyer and Gray Davis have made a name for themselves by creating inviting interiors that feel at once structured and relaxed, making use of an array of materials while maintaining a clean, modern feel. In the Copake, New York, lake house the firm created for Davis and his family, for example, raw wood walls and jute-wrapped pipes are offset by streamlined modern furniture. At the Bowery Meat Company in Manhattan, Meyer and Davis temper the industrial look that’s all too ubiquitous in the city’s eateries with plush velvet banquettes and rich walnut-paneled walls. These projects and more are on full display in the firm’s new book, Made to Measure (The Vendome Press, $60), which neatly summarizes the warm, tailored, and always personal interiors that have earned their firm its devoted following. On the occasion of its launch, AD caught up with Meyer and Davis to hear more about their process, aesthetic, and inspiration.

meyer-davis-1.jpg

Architectural Digest: You use so many natural elements, yet your spaces always look polished. How do you achieve that balance?

Will Meyer: Gray and I always like to celebrate the beauty and natural characteristics of the materials that we use. We have found that having a clean, more structured counterpoint to those materials allows one to appreciate and honor the qualities of the natural material more.

AD: How do your aesthetic goals change when decorating private and public spaces?

Gray Davis: Our aesthetic goals don’t differ between public and private spaces; that’s what we like about our work. By not drawing a distinction between the two, we are able to focus on creating meaningful spaces that can to be enjoyed whether as a home or hotel.

meyer-davis-3.jpg

AD: What are your favorite materials to work with?

WM: We really look for more of an assembly of materials that correlate and build off one another instead of selecting them individually. There are a few materials, such as wood, that we often gravitate to for our projects; however, in the end it’s really about creating a beautiful, clean palette where the materials speak to one another.

AD: How do you tie your design into the vernacular of a particular area?

GD: We tend to begin every project with a narrative that’s based off a core idea. Our work carries allusions that weave unique qualities of the space and take measure of subtle references and details in order to tell a story within the space.

meyer-davis-4.jpg

AD: How would you each describe Meyer Davis’s aesthetic in three words?

WM: Tailored, empathetic, bold.

GD: Personalized, thoughtful, structured.

Source: http://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/meyer-davis-warm-modern-rustic

No Comments

How to Make Your Kitchen Look Like a Million Bucks on a Dime

If there’s one thing we enjoy more than decorating, it’s cooking. Leisurely sipping a glass of wine while concocting a culinary feast (or quick weeknight meal) for our friends or family is truly one of life’s simple pleasures, wouldn’t you agree? That’s why we have so much love for the space where this magic happens: the kitchen. As the hero of the home, it deserves special attention. If yours is looking a little dated right now but you don’t have the finances to renovate, don’t stress. There are some low-cost kitchen home improvements you can make that don’t require a ton of cash. (For those who do, these home improvements are worth the money.)

We called on two of our favorite interior experts to share their budget-friendly kitchen upgrades (rentals included) that don’t involve a renovation. Ahead, Portland-based interior designer Max Humphrey and co-founders of Thea Home Inc. Thea Segal and Dorianne Passman share their kitchen home improvement tips to make yours look like a million bucks on a dime. Your credit card will approve. 

No Comments

Contemporary Addition to Heritage Cottage in Australia

architecture modern residence

“The client was keen to explore a contemporary approach to the new work, allowing for the new addition to juxtapose with the original weatherboard cottage,” the architects said. Most importantly, the project had to be energy efficient and environmentally-friendly.

 

modern residence (1)

 

The house was designed to capture the sunlight in winter, and to exclude it from heating up the spaces in summer. A geo-thermal heat recovery system heats the pool, floor slab and domestic hot water. Solar panels provide more electricity than the occupants are likely to use (feeding the surplus back into the grid). Last but not least, the charging station in the garage powers an electric vehicle.

Enjoy the photo gallery below and let us know your thoughts on this home extension in Australia! [Information provided by Tziallas Omeara Architecture Studio; Photography by Tom Ferguson]

 

modern residence (3)

Source: http://freshome.com/contemporary-addition-Australia/

No Comments

Can You Count How Many Beds This Small-Space Guest Bedroom Fits?

L.A. design firm Studio Lifestyle transforms a raw space into an airy retreat

Apartments aren’t the only places that demand a layout that maximizes space. Even though this 1929 San Marino, California, home was not in need of a major renovation, the owners felt that the bare guest bedroom on the second floor could use an update. Enter partners Shannon Wollack and Brittany Zwickl of L.A. design firm Studio Lifestyle, who were tapped to refresh and optimize the 140-square-foot room in the stately English Tudor. “All the furnishings were outdated, and the family needed extra room for when any of their four grandchildren—ages two to ten—visited,” says Wollack. “We wanted to fit as many beds as possible in this small space so they could have sleepovers.” To create a functional area for sleep and play, the designers configured the layout to fit five beds, installed built-ins to accommodate slanted ceilings, and expanded the room’s storage solutions. Here’s how Wollack and Zwickl gave the space a simple facelift and transformed it into a comfortable bedroom primed for fun.

Studio-lifestyle-guest-room_03.jpg
Photo: Diana Relth

The rooms’ slanted ceilings wouldn’t allow for traditional bunk beds, so the designers—who collaborated with L.A.–based architectural firm Togawa Smith Martin—built twin beds with trundles underneath them. “The spacious window seat can also serve as a fifth bed for a small child,” says Zwickl. With built-in shelves installed against the wall, headboards had to be pushed out to leave room for storage units that could hide pillows and blankets. “It also makes a good nightstand,” says Wollack.

Studio-lifestyle-guest-room_02.jpg
The room before.

“The guest room’s outdated ‘80s feel needed to be kid-friendly with a fresher look,” says Wollack. The color palette was kept neutral to appeal to the wide age-range of the grandchildren, and the wood floor was removed in favor of a soft carpet underfoot.

Studio-lifestyle-guest-room_01.jpg
Photo: Diana Relth

The windows reveal views of leafy branches, bringing to mind a cozy treehouse. To make them a focal point, geometric built-in shelves frame the casement. A pair of satin-brass sconces from Visual Comfort turn the window seat into a relaxing reading nook for lounging.

Studio-lifestyle-guest-room_05.jpg
Photo: Diana Relth

Subtle patterns add interest to a neutral color scheme. Stars on the Osborne & Little wallpaper echo the treehouse theme by mimicking an open sky; the background hue was color-matched with the paint covering the walls. The striped window treatment adds to the youthful design of the room.

Studio-lifestyle-guest-room_04.jpg
Photo: Diana Relth

To break up the solid base that hides the mattress beneath, the designers devised faux drawer fronts with satin-brass handles from Liz’s Antique Hardware. “The extra trundles are on wheels and can be moved anywhere in the room,” says Zwickl. The carpet’s chevron pattern lends texture to the decor.

Source: http://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/studio-lifestyle-guest-bedroom-before-after

No Comments

27 Modern Living Rooms Full of Luxurious Details

Your space can be both sleek and inviting

As one of the most frequent gathering spots for family and friends, whether you’re hosting a movie night or a cocktail party, living rooms should be welcoming and cozy—but that doesn’t mean you have to sacrifice style. These living rooms from the AD archives embrace a minimalist, modern aesthetic to great effect. Each space boasts a curated selection of clean-lined, contemporary furnishings warmed up with ever-so-subtle touches like luxurious upholstery, colorful artwork, and fresh greenery. A São Paulo living room by the Campana Brothers features a cloud-shaped, light-reflecting mirror; Jennifer Aniston’s Beverly Hills retreat boasts a koi pond; and an Aspen getaway by Atelier AM showcases a custom-made sectional sofa covered in a brick-red cotton. It’s time to mix a martini, sit down, and stay awhile.

Knoll CEO Andrew Cogan and his wife, Lori Finkel, commissioned architect Michael Haverland and decorator Philip Galanes to expand their house on New York’s Shelter Island. In the living room, 1950s swivel chairs by Edward Wormley for Dunbar are grouped with a cocktail table by Nicola L. and a ’60s Franco Albini rattan ottoman. On the right, a Studio Tord Boontje light fixture for Artecnica is suspended above a Mies van der Rohe Barcelona daybed covered in an Edelman leather.
Photo: Roger Davies
Knoll CEO Andrew Cogan and his wife, Lori Finkel, commissioned architect Michael Haverland and decorator Philip Galanes to expand theirhouse on New York’s Shelter Island. In the living room, 1950s swivel chairs by Edward Wormley for Dunbar are grouped with a cocktail table by Nicola L. and a ’60s Franco Albini rattan ottoman. On the right, a Studio Tord Boontje light fixture for Artecnica is suspended above a Mies van der Rohe Barcelona daybed covered in an Edelman leather.
Designer Poonam Khanna furnished the interiors of this house in New York's Hudson Valley, grouping BDDW sofas, a cocktail table from Ralph Pucci International, and a David Weeks Studio light fixture in the living room; the fireplace is by Fireorb.
Photo: William Waldron
Designer Poonam Khanna furnished the interiors of this house in New York’s Hudson Valley, grouping BDDW sofas, a cocktail table from Ralph Pucci International, and a David Weeks Studio light fixture in the living room; the fireplace is by Fireorb.
Desai/Chia Architecture is behind the design of media executive Nick Lehman and his wife, Tracy's New York City apartment.  The living room's Algue wall installation, created by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec for Vitra, was assembled by the Lehman family with the help of artist Jason Grunwald; the Swept sofas are by Blu Dot, and the shag rug is from ABC Carpet & Home.
Photo: Joshua McHugh
Desai/Chia Architecture is behind the design of media executive Nick Lehman and his wife, Tracy’s New York City apartment. The living room’s Algue wall installation, created by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec for Vitra, was assembled by the Lehman family with the help of artist Jason Grunwald; the Swept sofas are by Blu Dot, and the shag rug is from ABC Carpet & Home.
Handbag designer Nancy Gonzalez's Colombia apartment was designed and decorated in collaboration with Jean-Louis Deniot. A Candida Höfer photograph surmounts the living room’s custom-made sofa, which is flanked by vintage floor lamps by Gaetano Scolari (left) and Stilnovo; pre-Columbian objects stand on the Yves Klein cocktail tables, and the bronze crocodile side chairs are by Claude Lalanne.
Photo: Anita Calero
Handbag designer Nancy Gonzalez’s Colombia apartment was designed and decorated in collaboration with Jean-Louis Deniot. A Candida Höfer photograph surmounts the living room’s custom-made sofa, which is flanked by vintage floor lamps by Gaetano Scolari (left) and Stilnovo; pre-Columbian objects stand on the Yves Klein cocktail tables, and the bronze crocodile side chairs are by Claude Lalanne.
In architect and designer Daniel Romualdez's Los Angeles living room, a Romualdez-designed sofa and daybed, both upholstered in a raw silk, are grouped with vintage acrylic armchairs by Paul Rudolph; the painting on the far wall is by Sarah Morris, and the white sculpture is by Alessandro Twombly.
Photo: Roger Davies
In architect and designer Daniel Romualdez’s Los Angeles living room, a Romualdez-designed sofa and daybed, both upholstered in a raw silk, are grouped with vintage acrylic armchairs by Paul Rudolph; the painting on the far wall is by Sarah Morris, and the white sculpture is by Alessandro Twombly.
The firm Ingrao Inc. devised sumptuous interiors for the Manhattan apartment owned by jewelry designer Kara Ross and her husband, real-estate developer Stephen Ross. The living room features Maria Pergay sconces and Philippe Hiquily side tables, all vintage pieces from Galerie Yves Gastou, as well as a 1920s French lacquer cocktail table, a Jean-Michel Frank–style sectional sofa by Jonas, and a circa-1950 Edward Wormley slipper chair from Duane Modern. The tabletop sculpture at far left is by Martin Megna.
Photo: William Waldron
The firm Ingrao Inc. devised sumptuous interiors for the Manhattan apartment owned by jewelry designer Kara Ross and her husband, real-estate developer Stephen Ross. The living room features Maria Pergay sconces and Philippe Hiquily side tables, all vintage pieces from Galerie Yves Gastou, as well as a 1920s French lacquer cocktail table, a Jean-Michel Frank–style sectional sofa by Jonas, and a circa-1950 Edward Wormley slipper chair from Duane Modern. The tabletop sculpture at far left is by Martin Megna.
In this Aspen ski home by design firm Atelier AM, the living room features an expansive fireplace surround of blackened steel, a custom-made sectional sofa covered in a Loro Piana cotton, stools by Atelier AM in a Sam Kasten bouclé, a vintage Prouvé chair, and a Pierre Guariche floor lamp; the painting is by Richard Prince.
Photo: Pieter Estersohn
In this Aspen ski home by design firm Atelier AM, the living room features an expansive fireplace surround of blackened steel, a custom-made sectional sofa covered in a Loro Piana cotton, stools by Atelier AM in a Sam Kasten bouclé, a vintage Prouvé chair, and a Pierre Guariche floor lamp; the painting is by Richard Prince.
Gathered around the fireplace in designer Emily Summers's California living room are a Warren Platner settee, lounge chair, and ottoman, all upholstered in a fabric from Cowtan & Tout, and a wicker chair by Marc Newson; the panels over the fireplace, clad in a hand-painted Porter Teleo wallpaper, conceal a television. Between the glass doors is an Eric Schmitt console, surmounted by a Jim Dine lithograph.
Photo: Nikolas Koenig
Gathered around the fireplace in designer Emily Summers’s California living room are a Warren Platner settee, lounge chair, and ottoman, all upholstered in a fabric from Cowtan & Tout, and a wicker chair by Marc Newson; the panels over the fireplace, clad in a hand-painted Porter Teleo wallpaper, conceal a television. Between the glass doors is an Eric Schmitt console, surmounted by a Jim Dine lithograph.
Thomas Ruff’s photograph Substrat 24 I dominates the living room of designer Jamie Drake’s Manhattan apartment. Arranged around a marble-and-granite table by Drake Design Assoc. are a Milo Baughman lounge chair in a Christopher Hyland mohair, a Drake-designed sofa in a Schumacher fabric, and a pair of club chairs and a Bright Group ottoman that are covered in Rubelli velvets from Donghia.
Photo: William Waldron
Thomas Ruff’s photograph Substrat 24 I dominates the living room of designer Jamie Drake’s Manhattan apartment. Arranged around a marble-and-granite table by Drake Design Assoc. are a Milo Baughman lounge chair in a Christopher Hyland mohair, a Drake-designed sofa in a Schumacher fabric, and a pair of club chairs and a Bright Group ottoman that are covered in Rubelli velvets from Donghia.
B&B Italia sofas are grouped with Cappellini tables in the living room of designer Abigail Turin's California beach house; the floor lamp is by Flos, the throw is by Hermès, and the walls are painted in Benjamin Moore’s Chantilly Lace.
Photo: Dominique Vorillon
B&B Italia sofas are grouped with Cappellini tables in the living room of designer Abigail Turin’s California beach house; the floor lamp is by Flos, the throw is by Hermès, and the walls are painted in Benjamin Moore’s Chantilly Lace.
Interior designer collaborates with Lake|Flato Architects on her Texas ranch. In the living room, the steel fireplace surround is framed in eggshell-veneer panels by Chapeau Design.
Photo: Pieter Estersohn
Interior designer collaborates with Lake|Flato Architects on her Texas ranch. In the living room, the steel fireplace surround is framed in eggshell-veneer panels by Chapeau Design.
In the double-height living room of decorator Laura Santos's Manhattan townhouse, a curvaceous Vladimir Kagan sofa is arranged with a vintage cocktail table from Galerie Van den Akker, a 1940s French floor lamp, and a Dune bench upholstered in Mongolian lamb; the diptych is by Mark Francis.
Photo: Nikolas Koenig
In the double-height living room of decorator Laura Santos’s Manhattan townhouse, a curvaceous Vladimir Kagan sofa is arranged with a vintage cocktail table from Galerie Van den Akker, a 1940s French floor lamp, and a Dune bench upholstered in Mongolian lamb; the diptych is by Mark Francis.
In violinist Joshua Bell's 4,000-square-foot New York penthouse, devised by architect Charles Rose, the living area features Cassina sofas and a Robsjohn-Gibbings low table.
Photo: Scott Frances
In violinist Joshua Bell’s 4,000-square-foot New York penthouse, devised by architect Charles Rose, the living area features Cassina sofas and a Robsjohn-Gibbings low table.
A cloud-shaped mirror by Estudio Campana, the design firm behind this Brazilian home, reflects the living room and the garden. The firm also designed the bamboo-shade lamp and side table in the corner. An Antonio Citterio for B&B Italia sofa and matching daybed are grouped with a Maxalto cocktail table, also by Citterio; the armchairs are by Poltrona Frau, and the black lamp is by Oluce.
Photo: Björn Wallander
A cloud-shaped mirror by Estudio Campana, the design firm behind this Brazilian home, reflects the living room and the garden. The firm also designed the bamboo-shade lamp and side table in the corner. An Antonio Citterio for B&B Italia sofa and matching daybed are grouped with a Maxalto cocktail table, also by Citterio; the armchairs are by Poltrona Frau, and the black lamp is by Oluce.
In Jennifer Aniston's 1970s Beverly Hills home, designed by Stephen Shadley, the living room is an intimate space that opens to views of the koi pond.
Photo: Scott Frances
In Jennifer Aniston’s 1970s Beverly Hills home, designed by Stephen Shadley, the living room is an intimate space that opens to views of the koi pond.
In the living room of a Connecticut residence by Fox-Nahem Associates, walls painted in a moody Benjamin Moore gray offset an Andy Warhol silkscreen and a pair of 1960s Carlo Nason floor lamps. A Ron Arad sofa and a Karl Springer Lucite cocktail table from Lobel Modern are flanked by ’30s Gio Ponti armchairs. The sculpture on the lawn is by Peter Coffin.
Photo: Simon Upton
In the living room of a Connecticut residence by Fox-Nahem Associates, walls painted in a moody Benjamin Moore gray offset an Andy Warhol silkscreen and a pair of 1960s Carlo Nason floor lamps. A Ron Arad sofa and a Karl Springer Lucite cocktail table from Lobel Modern are flanked by ’30s Gio Ponti armchairs. The sculpture on the lawn is by Peter Coffin.
Iconic pieces from the 1960s and ’70s—chairs and a sofa by Osvaldo Borsani and a table by Ettore Sottsass—were chosen for the living room of this Manhattan duplex, designed by Lee F. Mindel with his partner Peter L. Shelton and senior interior designer Grace Sierra. Above the mantel is a Frank Thiel print.
Photo: Michael Moran
Iconic pieces from the 1960s and ’70s—chairs and a sofa by Osvaldo Borsani and a table by Ettore Sottsass—were chosen for the living room of thisManhattan duplex, designed by Lee F. Mindel with his partner Peter L. Shelton and senior interior designer Grace Sierra. Above the mantel is a Frank Thiel print.
A tapestry by Jan Yoors and a series of the artist’s charcoal drawings add graphic punch in the living room of this Nantucket vacation compound by Jacobsen Architecture. A Mies van der Rohe daybed by Knoll is grouped with a pair of Christophe Delcourt sofas from Ralph Pucci International.
Photo: Douglas Friedman
A tapestry by Jan Yoors and a series of the artist’s charcoal drawings add graphic punch in the living room of this Nantucket vacation compound by Jacobsen Architecture. A Mies van der Rohe daybed by Knoll is grouped with a pair of Christophe Delcourt sofas from Ralph Pucci International.
For his home in Sag Harbor, New York, architect Frank Greenwald hired decorators Foley & Cox to create relaxed, comfortable interiors. In the living room, the duo placed a linen-clad Christian Liaigre sofa and a pair of Poul Kjærholm leather-and-steel lounge chairs from Republic of Fritz Hansen around a cocktail table by FTF Design Studio.
Photo: Scott Frances
For his home in Sag Harbor, New York, architect Frank Greenwald hired decorators Foley & Cox to create relaxed, comfortable interiors. In the living room, the duo placed a linen-clad Christian Liaigre sofa and a pair of Poul Kjærholm leather-and-steel lounge chairs from Republic of Fritz Hansen around a cocktail table by FTF Design Studio.
In the living room of movie producer Peter Guber's Los Angeles home designed by Nancy Heller, a Jessica Rice triptych overlooks a Vladimir Kagan sofa from Ralph Pucci International and a Jean de Merry cocktail table.
Photo: Roger Davies
In the living room of movie producer Peter Guber’s Los Angeles home designed by Nancy Heller, a Jessica Rice triptych overlooks a Vladimir Kagan sofa from Ralph Pucci International and a Jean de Merry cocktail table.
In a New York apartment designed by ODA-Architecture, a Luceplan USA light fixture shimmers in the double-height living room, which is painted in a Benjamin Moore white and hung with curtains of a Sahco fabric; Poltrona Frau sofas join a marble cocktail table custom designed by Yutaka Takiura, and the floor lamps, side table, and Angora-goatskin rug are from DDC.
Photo: Anthony Cotsifas
In a New York apartment designed by ODA-Architecture, a Luceplan USA light fixture shimmers in the double-height living room, which is painted in a Benjamin Moore white and hung with curtains of a Sahco fabric; Poltrona Frau sofas join a marble cocktail table custom designed by Yutaka Takiura, and the floor lamps, side table, and Angora-goatskin rug are from DDC.
The Hollywood, Florida, getaway of Darlene and Jorge Pérez is filled with art from the couple’s vibrant collection. The back wall of the living room is dominated by a Günther Förg painting, while a work by Alexandre Farto hangs at right. A piece by Michele Oka Doner rests on the side table, and the colorful ball sculpture is by Beat Zoderer. Most of the furnishings throughout the residence are by Baltus Collection.
The Hollywood, Florida, getaway of Darlene and Jorge Pérez is filled with art from the couple’s vibrant collection. The back wall of the living room is dominated by a Günther Förg painting, while a work by Alexandre Farto hangs at right. A piece by Michele Oka Doner rests on the side table, and the colorful ball sculpture is by Beat Zoderer. Most of the furnishings throughout the residence are by Baltus Collection.
In the living room of a Manhattan duplex renovated by Steven Harris Architects and decorated by Rees Roberts + Partners, vintage Harvey Probber club chairs upholstered in a Kravet fabric face a custom-made sectional sofa. The clear table lamp is Murano glass.
Photo: Scott Frances
In the living room of a Manhattan duplex renovated by Steven Harris Architects and decorated by Rees Roberts + Partners, vintage Harvey Probber club chairs upholstered in a Kravet fabric face a custom-made sectional sofa. The clear table lamp is Murano glass.
In the living room of a Nova Scotia home by Alexander Gorlin Architects and Ray Frizzell Design, a pair of club chairs by Perez and a Kartell cocktail table are joined by a matching chair and ottoman by Ligne Roset. The ceiling fan is by Big Ass Fans, the three paper lanterns are Isamu Noguchi designs, and the rug is from ABC Carpet & Home.
In the living room of a Nova Scotia home by Alexander Gorlin Architects and Ray Frizzell Design, a pair of club chairs by Perez and a Kartell cocktail table are joined by a matching chair and ottoman by Ligne Roset. The ceiling fan is by Big Ass Fans, the three paper lanterns are Isamu Noguchi designs, and the rug is from ABC Carpet & Home.
Sports agent Stephen Dubin and his wife, Brenda Ellerin, an investment manager, commissioned Whipple Russell Architects and Tocha Project to create this modernist Beverly Hills home. In the living room, bespoke sofas, one covered in a gray Holly Hunt leather, are grouped with Gordon Guillaumier occasional tables and a Paola Lenti rug from Niche Beverly.
Photo: Roger Davies
Sports agent Stephen Dubin and his wife, Brenda Ellerin, an investment manager, commissioned Whipple Russell Architects and Tocha Project to create this modernist Beverly Hills home. In the living room, bespoke sofas, one covered in a gray Holly Hunt leather, are grouped with Gordon Guillaumier occasional tables and a Paola Lenti rug from Niche Beverly.
Architect Monica Mauti created a relaxing, contemporary, single-floor London residence—in a Victorian-era apartment building—for a couple and their two children. In the living room, which features a modular sofa, she kept the original windows and French doors and added a large fireplace wall made of Italian ceramic tile.
Photo: Andrew Twort
Architect Monica Mauti created a relaxing, contemporary, single-floor London residence—in a Victorian-era apartment building—for a couple and their two children. In the living room, which features a modular sofa, she kept the original windows and French doors and added a large fireplace wall made of Italian ceramic tile.
Seeking energy efficiency and the utmost in comfort, a couple hired Hariri & Hariri to renovate their 3,000-square-foot Manhattan apartment. In the living room, the sculpture is a Mariza Jonath, the sofas and chairs are by Christian Liaigre for Holly Hunt, and the side table is by Ralph Lauren Home.
Photo: Paul Warchol
Seeking energy efficiency and the utmost in comfort, a couple hired Hariri & Hariri to renovate their 3,000-square-foot Manhattan apartment. In the living room, the sculpture is a Mariza Jonath, the sofas and chairs are by Christian Liaigre for Holly Hunt, and the side table is by Ralph Lauren Home.
No Comments

Painting Ideas from a California Modernist Residence

Los Angeles designer Oliver Furth talks about the transformative qualities of bold hues and how to use them

Color is, in so many ways, design’s guiding principle—whether it’s the lack thereof or total saturation, it’s color that defines and gives life to a space. Few embrace this sentiment as clearly as Los Angeles–based interior designer Oliver Furth, who proclivity for bold hues manifests itself in this modernist California home, where glamour and drama were top of mind. “When selecting colors, I’m most often influenced by the light in a particular space,” explains Furth. “Here, we wanted to tap into the fantasy of a glamorous, modern, light-filled Los Angeles home, while also capturing the city’s beloved casual-ease.”

furth-color-ideas_01.JPG

Maintaining a thread of tailored urbanity throughout each space, Furth began to weave a tapestry of color that played to the homeowners budding decorative art collection. “Clients with important collections are often given a white box for a color palette, and I wanted to challenge those expectations,” affirms the designer. “This interior is object-driven and inspired by life and color, so we decided on an idiosyncratic lavender envelope as our new neutral. Purple (and its associated family) is the only color on the spectrum that’s both warm and cool. It plays well with strong colors, and is a great base for other neutrals, like beige, chocolate brown, black, navy.”

With his neutral in place, Furth introduced a slew of other tones and pigments, as in the merlot Edelman leather found on the settee in the breakfast nook or the persimmon silk from Donghia on the dining room chairs. “All of this strong color is balanced by a healthy dose of texture and materiality,” explains Furth. “I believe any color can be beautiful; it’s all about pairing and context.” Here, he offers five tips for decorating with vivid hues.

furth-color-ideas_02.jpg

Light Bright “The light in California is very warm, so cool colors work especially well,” muses the designer. “In Los Angeles, I often favor blues and greens, where back east I can use warmer tones. We also have so much clear light here, so a little bit of color reads very bright, and you can get away with using less pigment. In a city like New York, we need richer hues in order to make the same impact.”

furth-color-ideas_04.JPG

Forget Neutrals “Albert Hadley used to say that lime green was the only color that goes with everything, and Tony Duquette used malachite as a neutral. Beige was considered shocking when Jean Michel Frank debuted his version of Modernism in 1920s Paris, now beige is considered boring. Syrie Maugham’s all-white drawing room was avant-garde for 1930s London. Anything can be neutral (or not) in the right context.”

furth-color-ideas_03.JPG

Quick Change “Repaint your walls—it truly is transformative. My partner and I live with a lot of color at home and we change things around constantly. Painters come to our house quarterly to tweak a ceiling or repaint the walls in one room or another; for us, it keeps things fresh and interesting. I consider our home my personal color laboratory.”

furth-color-ideas_05.JPG

Color Fix “I love a white room, but white shows everything! White is a little like standing naked in front of an audience: Some of us can do it and look flawless, but the rest of us need Spanx. A little color goes a long way when masking flaws and imperfections.”

furth-color-ideas_07.JPG

Nature Made “Historic rooms are a great reference for me when it comes to colors and combination. There were some pretty wild color combos in the 1940s as well as the 1840s. Nature always introduces inspiring shades and hues. I love to look to flowers, fruits, birds, butterflies, sunsets—they all amaze me with bold and extraordinarily beautiful colorways.”

Source: http://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/oliver-furth-painting-ideas-from-a-california-modernist-residence

No Comments

12 Halloween Decor Hacks to DIY from Crate and Barrel’s Collection

Creating chic Halloween decor that’s both spooky and stylish takes some planning, and fortunately, Crate and Barrel’s Halloween section is full of *must-have* accessories that are the perfect inspo for a creative upgrade or a total DIY hack. Obviously, you have to have a few holiday favorites like no-carve pumpkins, black cats and ghostly spirits, but if you’re a discerning decorator looking for a sleek and modern aesthetic, take a cue from Crate and Barrel’s decor to bring your home to a spooktacular level of chic. Whether it’s adding luminaries to your porch or bringing some creepy crawlies to your table setting, these 12 Halloween decor hacks will easily (and inexpensively) turn your home into a glam spook-fest.

luminary

1. DIY Paper Lanterns: Halloween is *all* about the lighting, whether it be spooky or chic AF. Copy Crate and Barrel’s Boo Halloween Luminary ($15) with these sleek paper cutout luminaries. Once you’ve cut out these scary but oh, so pretty silhouettes, you can use these lanterns to decorate your mantel, dinner table or book shelf. Just remember to use battery-powered candles! (via Lia Griffith)

pumpkin-dish

2. DIY Color-Blocked Pumpkin Candy Dish: If you’re looking for an alternative color scheme this Halloween, transform traditional orange pumpkins into glam pastel candy dishes. Use Crate and Barrel’s Pumpkin Serving Bowls ($7+) for this project, or head to the dollar store and find an even less expensive option. (via A Kailo Chic Life)

pumpkin-candle

3. DIY Fast and Festive Pumpkin Votives: Good things come in small packages, or in this case, miniature pumpkins. ‘Tis the season for well-lit dinner parties, and while Crate and Barrel’s Pumpkin Candles ($17, set of three) are the perfect way to keep the theme going, the DIY version is a brilliant way to take your table centerpiece to the next level. Carve tea-light-sized holes in real or fake pumpkins and paint them your favorite fall shades. (via Francois et Moi)

cat-string-lights

4. DIY Cat String Lights: Take your love of everything feline-themed right to the ceiling. Make a copy of Crate and Barrel’s Halloween Cat String Lights ($35) with black construction paper and LED string lights. These meow-tastic twinklers come together really quickly, so you’ll have plenty of time to DIY a totally gorg mantel to go with your new kitty garland. (viaNostalgiecat)

paper-house

5. DIY Paper Craft Haunted House: Nothing perks up your mantel or coffee table like an entire haunted village. And while Crate and Barrel’s Halloween Haunted Graveyard ($25) is very stylish, the DIY version gets extra points for being handmade, 3D and ghost-ridden. Instead of shelling out on a whole slew of paper cutouts, easily DIY your own with this adorable printable version. (via Lia Griffith)

wreath

6. DIY Spooky Halloween Wreath: The coolest thing about the Crate and Barrel’s Black Branch Wreath ($50) is that you can leave it as-is or add a few bats and spiders for extra spookiness. Fortunately, the wreath is *v* easy to recreate with a quick trip outside or to the dollar store for branches. Grab a can of black spray paint and personalize your own minimalist black branch wreath in no time. (via Earnest Home Co.)

candlestick

7. DIY Spooky Crystal Ball Halloween Candlesticks: Nobody ever said art has to be in a frame. Dress up black candlesticks like Crate and Barrel’s Emmett Bronze Taper Candle Holders($19+) with clear Christmas balls and printable vintage creatures. These floating creepy crawlies are the perfect addition to a Halloween mantel or table centerpiece. (via Flamingo Toes)

table_runner

8. DIY No-Sew Halloween Table Runner: Bring an inexpensive table runner to Crate and Barrel’s level with this easy hack. Get inspired by their Halloween Pumpkins Felt Table Runner($17) to create the perfect table setting with this simple sewing project. Hang tiny black spiders at different levels along the edge to create maximum spookiness. (via Make It & Love It)

dish

9. DIY Halloween Silhouette Plates: Combine your love of dessert and ghoulish Victorian art into these chic dishes to make an easy hack of Crate and Barrel’s Halloween Black Cat Melamine Dinner Plate ($6). Melding the ever-popular vintage prints with a glam black and white color scheme might just be the *coolest* way to bring Halloween to the table. (viaBoxwood Avenue)

boo_letters

10. DIY Halloween Gumball Letters: Get in the season’s spirit with a colorful and modern typography piece that stylishly mimics Crate and Barrel’s Halloween BOO Letters ($35). The addition of gumballs makes this DIY extra playful — arrange the letters on your mantel or set them up on your bookshelf for a seasonal #shelfie. (via Sister’s Suitcase)

doormat

11. DIY Spiderweb Doormat: Once you’ve covered the inside of your house with Halloween decor, it’s time to turn your attention to the porch. Hack Crate and Barrel’s Haunted House Halloween Coir Doormat ($30) with just a few craft supplies. The spider-web shape is the perfect-sized decoration for even the smallest of entryways. (via Delia Creates)

pillow

12. DIY Mummy Pillow: Even if you’re not a sewing expert, you can hack Crate and Barrel’s Haunted House Halloween Pillow ($40) with this adorable DIY mummy pillow. For this no-sew project, all you need is a set of felt googly eyes and a roll of cheesecloth. It’s such a fun project that you might just find yourself mummifying every pillow on your couch. (viaEighteen 25)

Source: http://www.brit.co/diy-halloween-hacks-crate-and-barrel/

No Comments

10 homes with clever storage solutions on Dezeen’s Pinterest boards

Pegboard display walls and a partition made up of maze-like shelving are just some of the clever storage solutions squeezed into the small homes and tiny apartments that feature in this week’s Pinterest roundup.

pv2-lucas-y-hernandez-gil-dezeen-sq

PV2 by Lucas y Hernández-Gil

A partition wall incorporating a maze-like set of shelves separates the dining and living spaces of this light-filled Madrid apartment by Spanish studio Lucas y Hernández-Gil.

Find out more about PV2 ›


fold-out-furniture-silvia-allori-space-saving-furniture-sq

Home Office in Florence by Silvia Allori

Pegged holes in the walls provide modular bookshelves in this home and workspace that Silvia Allori designed for herself. The Florence apartment also features wall panels that fold down to form a dining-room table.

Find out more about Home Office in Florence ›


renovated-studio-flat-sydney-catseye-bay-space-saving-interiors-sq

Apartment renovation by Catseye

Bespoke joinery creates room dividers that double up as a wardrobe for this Sydney studio apartment renovated by local design firm Catseye Bay.

Find out more about this apartment renovation ›


custom-joinery-home-emil-eve-architects-space-saving-interiors-sq

Gibson Gardens by Emil Eve Architects

Architect couple Emma and Ross Perkin used plywood to create bespoke storage solutions inside this tiny London flat, allowing them to showcase books, toys and cooking ingredients.

Find out more about Gibson Gardens ›


space-saving-modular-studio-raanan-stern-space-saving-interiors-sq

Space-saving Modular Studio for an Artist by Raanan Stern

Two desks, pegboard display walls and a folding bed are contained inside this 15-square metre artist’s studio built by Israeli architect Ranaan Stern.

Find out more about Space-saving Modular Studio ›


casa_bea_buj_space-saving-interiors-dezeen-sq

Plywood Trio Apartment by Buj+Colón Arquitectos

Cupboards and bookshelves are built into a plywood staircase that also frames a doorway in this Madrid apartment by Buj+Colón Arquitectos. Pockets of space underneath each of the treads can also be used to display books and magazines.

Find out more about Plywood Trio Apartment ›


revamped-melbourne-house-austin-maynard-architects-sq

Toy Management House by Austin Maynard Architects

This remodelled Melbourne house by Austin Maynard Architects features a ground floor that lifts up to reveal a huge toy box, providing storage space for the occupant’s young son.

Find out more about Toy Management House ›


artists-studio-ruetemple-space-saving-interiors-sq

Artists’ Studio by Ruetemple

Plywood partitions also function as shelves in this Moscow studio and home for an artist, separating the working area from the living space, and keeping art supplies tidied away.

Find out more about Artists’ Studio ›


tel-aviv-townhouse-david-lebenthal-space-saving-interiors-sq

Mendelkern by David Lebenthal Architects

This Tel Aviv house that architect David Lebenthal designed for himself and his family features a staircase flanked by steel rods, which support welded shelves displaying plants and ceramics.

Find out more about Mendelkern ›


taiwan-apartment-hao-design-space-saving-interiors-sq

Source: http://www.dezeen.com/2016/10/14/popular-home-interiors-clever-storage-solutions-space-saving-furniture-pinterest/

No Comments

Brew: Better Coffee At Home

Hello world. I know that it’s been a while. I’m still alive, still drinking coffee and incessantly thinking about how much I love it. I’m sorry that I’ve been so absent, leaving this little space on the Internet idle and unloved. But this last year hasn’t been wasted. All of my energy and writing has been invested in completing a book. Yes, DCILY now has a book—Brew: Better Coffee at Home

After writing about coffee online and working with coffee offline for the past 7 years, I have finally been able to create a printed companion that will help coffee lovers better understand and enjoy better coffee at home—which has been the primary goal of this website since its inception.

I worked with the awesome team at Dovetail Press, a newly launched publishing company in New York, to create this approachable guide to home brewing. For everyone who has contacted me over the years through email or social media with questions about coffee, equipment, and brewing techniques, this book will provide my answers. This book is not meant to train professional baristas (though it may inspire you to pursue that path), it’s meant to be an informative first step for the coffee curious.

I wrote Brew as a primer to help coffee consumers feel more comfortable buying coffee and brewing equipment, while also gaining the knowledge and confidence to ask their baristas more specific questions that address their particular needs. In the book I explain the basics of coffee production, the tools and techniques required to brew it better at home and also provide a selection of recipes for some delicious coffee-based drinks and cocktails. I hope this book will inspire people to love coffee the same way this website has over the years. I can’t wait to get a copy of it in all of your hands.

Brew goes on sale September 20th, but you can pre-order it now directly from the publisher or from Amazon. If you are interested in ordering multiple copies for resale, get in touch.

Source: http://www.dearcoffeeiloveyou.com/brew-better-coffee-at-home/